Section Mastersianum Fowl.

3 species are included:-

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a. PAPHIOPEDILUM MASTERSIANUM (Rchb.f.) Stein

b. PAPHIOPEDILUM WENTWORTHIANUM Schoser and Fowl.

c PAPHIOPEDILUM ZIECHIANUM Schoser

d. P. MASTERSIANUM var. mohrianum

General


a. PAPHIOPEDILUM MASTERSIANUM (Rchb.f.) Stein

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These plants have 'spoon like' petals, covered in fine marginal hairs. Warts, when present, are limited to the basal upper half of the petals. Foliage is tessellated. (91) This is a medium sized terrestrial species. Its leaves are up to 220 mm long, 45 mm wide, deep green in colour, tessellated with pale green. The single flowered inflorescence grows up to 400 mm high. The flowers are 100 to 120 mm across, about 75 mm high. The dorsal sepal is green, veined darker green, with a white or cream margins. The synsepalum is pale green. Petals are copper-coloured to reddish-purple, spotted on their upper halves with dark purple, the lower halves greenish towards their base. The lip is pale chestnut-brown, yellowish above, the side lobes olive- brown sprinkled with purple. (8) Paterson (80) notes there appears to be two forms of this species - copper toned flowers from Arnboin Island, and reddish-purple flowers from Ceram.

The plant was named in 1879, after Dr Maxwell T. Masters, editor for the British Magazine The Gardeners' Chronicle, (4) after being discovered in the Sundra Islands. It is native of Borneo and adjacent islands. (8) Cribb 105 notes it occurs at elevations of between 900 and 2000 metres on steep slopes where it grows as a terrestrial in the shade in montane forest. Paterson (80) discusses hybridisation with this species, plus its culture.

It flowers in January to March (Southern Hemisphere equivalent months) after a slight winter rest. It needs moderately shaded conditions, in intermediate conditions. Culture and natural habitat conditions appear similar to that specified for P. violascens, the exact habitat of this species remaining undescribed. (3)

Braem 135 describes Paphilopedilum mohrianum, from the Flores Island of Indonesia. It was named after Mr Hartmut Mohr of West Germany, a keen orchidologist and botanical artist. Koopowitz 112 believes it cannot be distinguished from P. mastersianum and therefore does not list it as a valid species.

P. X bundtianum Fowl. is the natural hybrid between this species and P. ceramensis. (3)

Paphiopedilum mastersianum var. mohrianum is an intermediate form between mastersanum and bullenianum. Koopowitz 153 believes it is only a form of mastersianum, and is endemic to one island. He states it may be a natural hybrid between the two psecies.


b. PAPHIOPEDILUM WENTWORTHIANUM Schoser and Fowl.

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Another species not widely known, it was introduced into cultivation by Wentworth in 1968. It is native of Kieta, Bougainville in the Soloman Islands, growing in deep forests in thick beds of humus at an altitude of some 800 to 1200 metres. If flowers in November and December, (Southern Hemisphere equivalent months) and again in April to June after a brief winter rest. It prefers low light conditions in intermediate to warm conditions. (3) Asher (5) states it is not to be confused with P. hougainvilleanum. It is illustrated in his article. (5) Cribb 105 notes there is probably only one or two hundred plants in its only known natural locality.

c PAPHIOPEDILUM ZIECHIANUM Schoser

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This was first described in 1976 (3) after its discovery in the Ararak mountains of Western New Guinea (West Irian) 3 After being discovered in 1961. By the time it was described all known live material had died and it was described from herbarium material and photographs. 113 It is lost to cultivation, although is illustrated by Asher. (5)

Azadehdel (81) reports the re-discovery of this species in the habitat where it was originally found.

Cribb 105 notes P. zieckianum was collected in 1961 by F.U. Zieck, Luytyes and Vink in west New Guinea but believes it is identical to P. papuanum.

Cribb 105 notes it has been found between 800 and 1050 metres above sea level in light shade of frees and fern amongst granitic rocks. The annual precipitation is high with humidity approaching saturation all year.

General

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These species need to be grown in an open compost to allow air to reach the roots, but with moss to ensure moisture is always present. They need heavy watering all the year, but especially during the summer vegetative growth phase, when warm moist conditions must be provided. High humidity is appropriate all the year, with good ventilation. They also prefer shady conditions, in intermediate to warm temperatures.

 



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Site established 9th May 1998
Paphiopedilum series first uploaded 8th December 1999