3 c . SECTION GEOCYMBIDIUM

A single species section, with highly distinctive features.

3. c. I  Cym lancifolium Hook

Synonyms
Cym      cuspidatum
Cym
      javanicum
Cym
      gibsonii
Cym
      papuanum
Cym
      caulescens
Cym
      kerrii
Cym
      nagifolium
Cym
      aspidistrifolium
Cym
      syunitianum
Cym
      javanicum var. aspidistrifolium
Cym
      maclehoseae
Cym
      lancifolium var. aspidistrifolium
Cym
      lancifolium var. syunitianum
Cym
      robustum
Cym
      bambusifolium

This is the most widespread species in the genus, and one that shows considerable variation, reflecting in the considerable number of synonyms. This species was originally described in 1823, from a plant collected in Nepal.

Cym lancifolium is a medium to small terrestrial, which has thick fleshy roots, often visible as stilt-like supports keeping the rest of the plant well above the growing medium. The pseudobulbs range from 30 to 150 mm tall, closely spaced and often crowded to the apex of the rhizome. The new growth is formed annually from a shoot produced slightly above the base of the mature pseudobulb, causing the plant to grow at an angle of about 45 degrees to the horizontal.. Each pseudobulb produces about 2 to 4 true leaves, although there are about 6 to 9 false leaves. The leaves are 90 to 500 m long. The scape is 70 to 350 mm long, bearing 4 to 8 flowers. Each flower is 25 to 50 mm across, not usually scented, the petals and sepals usually white to pale green, occasionally apple green with a central maroon stripe, and spotting over the mid vein which does not reach the apex, and which may be weak or absent in the sepals. The lip is white, pale green or pale yellow, with red spots and blotches on the mid lobe, and purple-red stripes on the side lobes which join together at the margin.

This species has an extensive distribution, North India, Nepal, Bhutan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Ryukyu Islands, Japan, Burma, Indochina, West Malaysia, Java, Sumatra, Borneo, Moluccas, and New Guinea. It grows from 300 to 2300 metres above sea level, in deep shade in broad leaved forest, usually in rich soil and deep humus and leaf litter, often in conjunction with tree roots or rotting wood. The broad leaves appear to be an adaptation to low light conditions on the forest floor. The flowering period is variable, but generally is mid spring to mid winter in the more northern seasonal localities, and is sporadic throughout the year in the southern tropical localities.


Site established 9th May 1998