[ space picture ]The Ground of Faith

Exploring Science, Mysticism and Experience Together

May 2007
K'ung Fu-Tzu

Editors: The Rev. Michael Cocks and The Rev. Victor MacGill

Contents

Editorial

Isn't Spirit the ground of Christianity?

Edward Kelly, et. al's Irreducible Mind: Towards a psychology for the 21st century

Spiritualism in the Old Testament
Rev. G. Maurice Elliot

What--Really--Is the "Science and Religion Dialogue" All About?
Eric Weislogel

Kurt Gödel's Mathematical and Scientific Perspective of the Divine: A Rational Theology
Hector Rosario

Book Reviews

Richard Dawkins: The God Delusion
Reviewer Victor MacGill

Experience

The Most Awesome Spirit Story You'll Ever Read--K'ung Fu Tzu
Mike Tymn

Editorial

Isn't Spirit the ground of Christianity?

We begin by repeating our December notice of a truly remarkable book:

Edward Kelly, et. al's Irreducible Mind: Towards a psychology for the 21st century

[ Irreducible Mind ][Kelly, Edward F.; Kelly, Emily W.; Crabtree, Adam; Gauld, Alan; Grosso, Michael; Greyson, Bruce. 2007. ISBN 0-7425-4792-2 Cloth, 800 pages.

With CD containing F W H Myers's hard to find classic 2-volume Human Personality (1903). To order, call toll-free 1-800-462-6420 or write to Rowman and Littlefield, 15200 NBN Way, PO Box 191, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214-0191 $US 79-95. Some special prices if you order through Amazon]

“This is an extraordinary book. In the area of the neuroscience of the mind, it is the most exciting reading to have crossed my path in years” -David Presti, Professor of Neurobiology, University of California-Berkeley.

“Brilliant, heroic and astonishing... A scientifically rigorous and philosophically informed critique of various contemporary orthodoxies in mainstream psychology. Irreducible Mind has a bottom-line: either our current understanding of the material world is woefully incomplete because we still don't know how to explain mental powers in purely physical, or else there is far more to reality than just the material world” Richard A. Shweder.. Professor Dept of Human Development University of Chicago.

Current mainstream scientific opinion holds that all aspects of human mind and consciousness are generated by physical processes occurring in brains. The present volume demonstrates – empirically – that this reductive material is not only incomplete but false. Topics addressed include phenomena of extreme psychophysical influence, memory, psychological automatisms and secondary personality, near-death experiences and allied phenomena, genius-level creativity and 'mystical' states of consciousness both spontaneous and drug induced. The authors show that these 'rogue' phenomena are more readily accommodated by an alternative 'transmission' or 'filter' theory of mind/brain relations – a theory that ratifies the common-sense conception of human beings as causally effective conscious agents, and is also fully compatible with leading-edge physics and neuroscience. The book should command the attention of all open-minded persons concerned with the still-unsolved mysteries of the mind.

Discussion of Irreducible Mind
<http://www.esalenctr.org/display/confpage.cfm ?confid=19&pageid=144&pgtype=1>

Dr. Richard G. Petty's review of Irreducible Mind
<http://www.aaabooksearch.com /Reviews/ISBN_0742547922>

This book uses the work of psychologist and philosopher William James and F.W.H. Myers and also all the disciplined psychic research over the past 130 years, and refutes the belief that mind is purely and simply the product of electrochemical processes in the brain. It affirms the reality of all the phenomena that materialists deny, telepathy, inspiration, clairvoyance not to mention the afterlife, and implies that Christians should resist the temptation to succumb to materialist prejudice and see the arena of Christianity in purely this-worldly terms.

Spiritualism in the Old Testament
Rev. G. Maurice Elliot

[ Priest wearing Urim and Thummim ][Priest wearing Urim and Thummim: According to the teachings of Judaism, a small parchment with God's holy name, the Tetragrammaton, inscribed on it was slipped into an opening under the Urim and Thummim on the high priest's breast plate, which caused the breastplate to "glow" and thereby "transmit messages" from God to the Children of Israel]

About this article: I hope that readers will not be put off by the word “Spiritualism”. Our I-Thou with Spirit and with our fellows is very much more than séances and psychic phenomena, and it is unfortunate that the word has become associated with churches focusing especially on communication with the so-called dead. But readers may well agree that all the phenomena that are associated with psychic research and the paranormal are indeed to be found in the Old Testament, and of course the New Testament, and believed often to occur in our services of worship and prayer.

“The Bible was written by Spiritualists--even though they did not call themselves by that name. It is a psychical or Spiritualistic book from cover to cover. Its narratives are mainly Spiritualistic. They deal with visions, voices, dreams, trance, materialization, dematerialization, levitation, automatic-writing, mediums, spiritual healings and so forth. This will become transparently clear to any one who will seriously study the Bible.”

Spiritualism in the Old Testament
<http://www.freewebs.com/oldtestament/>

What--Really--Is the "Science and Religion Dialogue" All About?
Eric Weislogel

[ Eric Weislogel ]... “The truly constructive engagement of science and religion is not some idiosyncratic academic sideline. Rather, what we mean by the “science and religion dialogue” is short-hand for the essence of liberal, humane, integrated education--education that not only is internally integrated but that is also integrated with the whole of life. It is the attempt to get the whole story of the whole cosmos for the whole person.”

What--Really--Is the “Science and Religion Dialogue” All About?
<http://www.metanexus.net /magazine/ArticleDetail/tabid/68/id/9484/Default.aspx>

Kurt Gödel's Mathematical and Scientific Perspective of the Divine: A Rational Theology
Hector Rosario

[ Kurt Godel ]Kurt Gödel, the preeminent mathematical logician of the twentieth century, is best known for his celebrated Incompleteness Theorems; yet he also had a profound rational theology worthy of serious consideration. “The world is rational,” (Wang, 1996: 316) asserted Gödel, evoking philosophical theism, “according to which the order of the world reflects the order of the supreme mind governing it” (Yourgrau, 2005: 104-105).

Kurt Gödel's Mathematical and Scientific Perspective of the Divine
<http://www.metanexus.net /magazine/ArticleDetail/tabid/68/id/9796/Default.aspx>

Book Reviews

Richard Dawkins: The God Delusion
Reviewer Victor MacGill

ISBN: 0618680004 / Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company / Date: Oct 2006 / Page Count: 406

I was looking forward to reading this book to challenge my ideas about spirituality. Richard Dawkins is atheist, writing a book to convince people into becoming atheists. Unfortunately I was sadly disappointed by the book. Since he was openly trying to convert people, he tended to give a biased picture of religion over the centuries, highlighting the evils and downplaying the positive sides. He spent most of the book looking at fundamentalist religions in Christianity and Islam.

Perhaps this would have been more relevant for me had I been living in the US where fundamentalist Christian beliefs are much more a part of the mainstream, so Dawkins would not appear to be making his case against the extreme edges of Christianity, but about what most believers would follow. He discussed the reasons why humans need to create religions from an evolutionary psychology perspective, but again seemed to miss the boat in terms of describing the need for religion in early human societies in terms of how a society with religion might have an advantage against a society or community that did not. He also did not delve into the philosophical questions such as "what is the nature of self" in a way I would have expected.

Dawkins created his own definitions for agnostic and atheist that were much wider than is found in a dictionary definition, which is somewhat ingenuous. Instead of an agnostic being someone who says we can not know of the nature or existence of God, Dawkins defines an agnostic as someone who believes science can not prove the or disprove the existence of God. There is a large number of people with very strong religious convictions (including myself) who could describe themselves as agnostic according to his definition, but not by a dictionary definition. That makes his potential readers far more likely to to consider that maybe they are agnostic after all.

See also Madeleine Bunting in the Guardian
<http://www.guardian.co.uk /Columnists/Column/0,5673,1681235,00.html>

Experience

The Most Awesome Spirit Story You'll Ever Read--K'ung Fu Tzu
Mike Tymn

Over the years I have read hundreds of accounts of spirit communication through mediums. People sometimes ask me to name the most interesting case I have come across. I tell them it is the story told by Dr. Neville Whymant, a British professor of linguistics, in his 1931 book, Psychic Adventures in New York.

[ Confucius ]Whymant, who is said to have known 30 languages, was visiting New York City in 1926 and was invited to attend a séance at the home of Judge and Mrs. William Cannon on Park Ave. Whymant had never before attended a séance and was quite sceptical, even though he knew William Cannon to be a highly-respected lawyer and judge.

It was explained to Whymant that the medium, George Valiantine, was a direct-voice medium and that his vocal cords did not produce the voices or sounds he would hear during the séance. Rather, an aluminium trumpet, which was placed in the centre of the circle of chairs, would be used by the spirits in amplifying their otherwise weak or whispered voices. The medium, Whymant was told, simply provided the ectoplasm from which the spirits moulded vocal cords and larynges. Whymant had heard such mediums are expert ventriloquists and was on guard for that possibility.

Like many mediums, George Valiantine apparently began losing some of his powers, during the early 1930s, after a dozen or so years of producing awesome phenomena. As a result, he was accused of being a charlatan and his reputation was thereafter tainted. It is, however, difficult to read the accounts of Valiantine's mediumship by many credible and intelligent men and believe that he was anything but a true medium before his powers began leaving him, or before low-level spirits began controlling him. It was reported that at least 14 languages, including Portuguese, Italian, Basque, Welsh, Japanese, Spanish, Russian, Hindustani, and Chinese were spoken by spirits through Valiantine. Moreover, many deceased friends and relatives spoke to the sitters in their characteristic voices and talked of things which Valiantine could not possibly have known about or researched.

To begin the séance, the group recited the Lord's Prayer, and then sacred music was played on a gramophone in order to “bring the vibrations into harmony with those of the spirit world.”

“Suddenly into the sound of the singing came the sound of a strong voice raised in greeting,” Whymant recorded. “It seemed to rise up from the floor and was so strong that for some moments I felt convinced that I could actually feel the vibrations of the floor.” The voice, Whymant was informed, was that of Dr. Barnett, the spirit leader of the circle, who opened it and closed it at will. Shortly thereafter, another voice “totally different in timbre and quality” was heard. This voice, the newcomers were informed, was that of Blackfoot, an American Indian of the tribe of that name, who was the keeper of the “spirit door.” Some whispered messages to regular members of the circle from deceased relatives or friends then followed. Mrs. Whymant's father communicated in his characteristic drawl, reminiscent of the West County of England. Whymant was certain that Valiantine could have known nothing of his wife's father.

The trumpet floated in front of Whymant and he heard a “voice” come through in an ancient Chinese dialect: Greeting, O son of learning and reader of strange books! This unworthy servant bows humbly before such excellence. Whymant recognized the language as that of the Chinese Classics, edited by Confucius 2,500 years earlier. It was Chinese so dead colloquially as Sanskrit or Latin. “If this was a hoax, it was a particularly clever one, far beyond the scope of any of the sinologues now living,” Whymant mused.

Although he understood the ancient language, Whymant found it necessary to respond in more modern Chinese. Peace be upon thee, O illustrious one. This uncultured menial ventures to ask thy name and illustrious style. The “voice” replied: My mean name is K'ung, men call me Fu-tsu, and my lowly style is Kiu.

Whymant recognized this as the name by which Confucius was canonized. Not certain that he heard right, Whymant asked for the voice to repeat the name. “This time without any hesitation at all came the name K'ung-fu-tzu,” Whymant wrote. “Now I thought, was my opportunity. Chinese I had long regarded as my own special research area, and he would be a wise man, medium or other, who would attempt to trick me on such soil. If this tremulous voice were that of the old ethicist who had personally edited the Chinese classics, then I had an abundance of questions to ask him.”

At that point, the “voice” was difficult to understand and Whymant had to ask for repetition. “Then it burst upon me that I was listening to Chinese of a purity and delicacy not now spoken in any part of China.”

Apparently the communicating spirit recognized that Whymant was having a difficult time understanding the ancient dialect and changed to a more modern dialect. Whymant wondered how he could test the voice and remembered that there are several poems in Confucius' Shih King which have baffled both Chinese and Western scholars.

Whymant addressed the “voice”: This stupid one would know the correct reading of the verse in Shih King. It has been hidden from understanding for long centuries, and men look upon it with eyes that are blind. The passage begins thus: Ts'ai ts'ai chüan êrh…

Whymant had recalled that line as the first line of the third ode of the first book of Chou nan, although he did not recall the remaining 14 lines. “The ‘voice' took up the poem and recited it to the end,” Whymant wrote.

The “voice” put a new construction on the verses so that it made sense to Whymant. It was, the “voice” explained, a psychic poem. The mystery was solved. But Whymant had another test. He asked the “voice” if he could ask for further wisdom.

Ask not of an empty barrel much fish, O wise one! Many things which are now dark shall be light to thee, but the time is not yet…the “voice” answered.

Whymant addressed the “voice”: “…In Lun Yü, Hsia Pien, there is a passage that is wrongly written. Should it not read thus:…?

Before Whymant could finish the sentence, the “voice” carried the passage to the end and explained that the copyists were in error, as the character written as 'sê' should have been 'i', and the character written as 'yen' is an error for 'fou'. It all made sense to Whymant, and a mystery that had bothered scholars had been solved.

Whymant attended 11 additional sittings, dialoguing with the “voice” claiming to be Confucius in a number of them. At one sitting, another “voice” broke in speaking some strange French dialect. Whymant recognized it as Labourdin Basque. Although he was more accustomed to speaking Spanish Basque, he managed to carry on a conversation with the “voice.”

“Altogether fourteen foreign languages were used in the course of the twelve sittings I attended,” Whymant concluded the short book. “They included Chinese, Hindi, Persian, Basque, Sanskrit, Arabic, Portuguese, Italian, Yiddish, (spoken with great fluency when a Yiddish- and Hebrew-speaking Jew was a member of the circle), German and modern Greek.”

Whymant also recorded that at one sitting, Valiantine was carrying on a conversation in American English with the person next to him while foreign languages were coming through the trumpet. “I am assured, too, that it is impossible for anyone to ‘throw his voice,' this being merely an illusion of the ventriloquist,” he wrote.

Not being a spiritualist or psychical researcher, Whymant did not initially plan to write the book. However, tiring of telling the story so many times, he agreed to put it in writing, asking that with the publication of the book that others not ask him to tell the story again.

K'ung Fu Tzu--an abbreviated version
<http://www.lightlink.com/arpr/>
(Click on the “Life After Death” button and go to “14 languages….”)

K'ung Fu Tzu--in Whymant's own words
<http://www.harvestfields.ca/ebook/001/13/00.htm>



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