TWM STORMS, FLOODS - NORTHLAND REGION 2007


Transit NZ - Waitangi Day request to fly Maori flag on bridge denied

Tino Rangatiratanga flag
Click here for background info.

1. Maori Party's response

Sovereignty flag should fly, says Maori Party
NZ Herald Wednesday January 31, 2007
The Maori Party say it is time New Zealand "grew up" and allowed Maori to fly sovereignty flags on Waitangi Day. The party is unimpressed that a request by a Maori sovereignty group to fly the Maori independence flag on the Auckland Harbour Bridge on Waitangi Day was rejected by Transit. Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia said the flag should be allowed... "It's time New Zealand grew up and accepted the Maori nations and that they should be able to have their own independent flag in the same way that Aboriginals do." [...]

2. TWM's response - instant retribution

To:
Shona.Hutchinson@transit.govt.nz
Subject: Racist Transit policy - Corporate flag Vs Sovereignty flag
CC:
Date: Sun, 04 Feb 2007 23:43:20 +1300
Status: normal
From: twm@twm.co.nz
Reply-to: twm@twm.co.nz

ATTENTION:

Board of Transit New Zealand,
Chief Executive, Rick van Barneveld

See article from The New Zealand Herald, Sunday February 04, 2007.
It seems that Transit has not learned from the past.
Suggest you all read this account of what happened after Waitangi day 2004.
Web page: THE BIG FLOOD - Feb, 2004  URL: http://twm.co.nz/wet2004.html

Time to teach Transit another lesson.

Sincerely,

John Porter
WM Consultant
Web site: http://twm.co.nz/
E-mail: twm@twm.co.nz

To:
Shona.Hutchinson@transit.govt.nz
Subject: Update on Racist Transit policy - Corporate flag Vs Sovereignty flag
CC:
Date: Tue, 03 Apr 2007 10:25:13 +1200
Status: normal
From: twm@twm.co.nz
Reply-to: twm@twm.co.nz

ATTENTION:

Board of Transit New Zealand,
Chief Executive, Rick van Barneveld

Further to my email of 4 February.
As promised, last week's flood damage (see report below) is the direct consequence of Transit's racist policy prohibiting the Maori flag from flying on the Auckland Harbour Bridge.
Until there is a complete reversal of this policy, Transit can expect a series of similar infrastructural damage from flooding.

Regards

John Porter
WM Consultant

Flood damage to top $80 million

NZ Herald Sunday April 01, 2007
Severe flooding in the Far North and Bay of Islands has left an estimated repair bill of up to $80 million. Civil defence and emergency agencies said that estimate included about $20 million for damage to the local roading network alone.
The one-in-150-year event left a trail of destruction across rural and urban areas, Far North District Council spokesman Rick McCall said. Preliminary assessments suggested as many as 3000ha of Far North farmland were affected....
As many as 228 individual properties were affected by the storm, including up to 50 business premises and 121 homes flooded, and some 50 properties with structural damage. [...]

   FLOOD IMAGES Click here.

UPDATE: 
Bridge flag angers Maori MP
NZ Herald Thursday May 10, 2007
Maori Party MP Hone Harawira says he is appalled that Transit allowed the European Union flag to fly on Auckland Harbour bridge. "I'm referring this to the Race Relations Office," said Mr Harawira. "It's an insult to Maori, and an insult to the intelligence of all New Zealanders. "Transit can't say that we won't fly your [Maori] flag because it doesn't represent a country, and then go and fly another one that doesn't represent a country... The flag flew yesterday, in recognition of Europe Day. The observance was requested by the European Commission delegation to New Zealand... Mr Spies said there had been no change in policy that would allow the tino rangatiratanga flag on the bridge in future.
COMMENT: It's obvious that Transit is a slow learner. No problem arranging another $100 million flood disaster. Watch this space. (10.05.07)

UPDATE:
NZ flag only one to fly from bridge
ONE News May 30, 2007
Transit has angered the Maori Party with its decision to only fly the New Zealand flag from the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Transit reviewed its policy on what flags could fly on the bridge following complaints before Waitangi Day when the Tino Rangatiratanga flag wasn't allowed to fly because it was not a national flag. Chief executive Rick van Barneveld says the company has become increasingly distracted by the flag controversy.... The Maori Party is up in arms over the decision. Maori Party co-leader Dr Pita Sharples says the focus in Transit's new statement is on days of national mourning, which is appropriate as we should all be mourning the death of tolerance and diversity in the wake of the decision.
COMMENT: Transit may have changed its policy but not its racist character. TWM will continue with its initial intention. (30.05.07)

UPDATE:
To:
Shona.Hutchinson@transit.govt.nz
Subject: Update on racist Transit flag policy
CC: aking@ministers.govt.nz
Date: Wed, 11 Jul 2007 22:46:43 +1200
Status: urgent
From: twm@twm.co.nz
Reply-to: twm@twm.co.nz

ATTENTION:
Board of Transit New Zealand,
Chief Executive, Rick van Barneveld

Tena koe Mr van Barneveld,

Further to my emails of 4 February and 3 April.
No doubt, if you and your board have been monitoring the weather disasters of the past few weeks, you will now realise that I do not make predictions unless they can be supported by appropriate action. See TWM website for past major projects viz. http://twm.co.nz/sitemap.html
As promised, the latest repeat of the Northland floods, excluding the South Island snowfalls and Taranaki tornadoes, should reach the targeted cost of $100 million as predicted on 10 May. (See http://twm.co.nz/tranflag.html )
The expanded scope and intensity of recent weather disasters is a signal to your masters (Pakeha government) that Transit's racist flag policy is quickly becoming a huge liability for the Pakeha economy.
Negative attitudes engender negative consequences.

More to come. Enjoy.

Sincerely,

John Porter
WM Consultant

Deluge leaves trail of destruction
Stuff Wednesday, 11 July 2007
A state of emergency was declared in the Far North as a month's worth of rain fell in less than 12 hours, closing roads and leaving thousands of people without power or phones. The little town of Kaeo, devastated by storms in late March, had 253mm of rain between midnight and 3am yesterday - a once-in-150-years event, according to hydrologists.
State Highway 1, the main road north, was closed at the southern end of the Brynderwyns but scores of other roads were closed by slips, flooding or fallen trees. Some of the slips further damaged roads which were about to be reopened after damage caused by the March storm was repaired. Those roads were likely to stay closed for some time... Many homes were evacuated and many had had their roofs blown off. Some of the damaged homes were still being repaired after a huge storm hit the Northland area in March when more than 350mm of rain fell...  Up to 100,000 households and businesses were without power in the north of the country overnight following stormy weather which also caused flooding, slips and road closures. The Far North district declared a state of emergency after widespread rain and strong winds caused damage on a par with what the region suffered in March.
[...]
COMMENT: Two "one-in-150-year events" in the same location in three months must be a record. Again, was it coincidence or synchronicity? (13.07.07) Compare with the Bay of Plenty floods of July 2004 and May 2005.

After the storm - the bill
NZ Herald Thursday July 12, 2007
Damage from the wild weather that has lashed the country will cost tens of millions to fix - and leave homeowners in vulnerable spots facing higher premiums to help cover the costs. Chris Ryan, chief executive of the Insurance Council, said the storm damage would cost much more than the $80 million bill from floods in March. "There's no firm figure at this stage, but anecdotally the floods in Northland will cost more than the March floods up there. The confluence of events around the country mean it will be quite a severe bill."
[...]


UPDATE: STORMS GALORE!

Flood clean-up starts as rainclouds lift
NZ Herald Wednesday August 01, 2007
Otago and Southland yesterday started the big clean-up after torrential rain that caused flooding in many areas.The rain led to the evacuation of families from their homes and forced the closure of several main roads in the lower South Island.

July month of weather extremes and contrasts
NZ Herald Wednesday August 01, 2007
July brought severe floods, numerous damaging tornadoes, destructive winds, and ice and severe frosts. The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (Niwa) said today that rainfall was well above normal in the north and the east of the North Island and in coastal South Canterbury and Otago during July... A depression west of the North Island on July 4-5 produced thunderstorms and swarms of damaging tornadoes in Taranaki. Niwa said the episode was the first time that a swarm of at least seven or more damaging tornadoes had been recorded in New Zealand, all within a 24-hour period... More tornadoes also hit Auckland and Tauranga... Major flooding also happened in parts of Hawke's Bay on July 17-18. More flooding happened in south Canterbury and Otago on July 30 and Dunedin received more than a month's rainfall within 24 hours. [...]

Extreme weather eats away Tower profit expectations
NZ Herald Wednesday August 01, 2007
Last month's floods in Auckland, Northland and Coromandel, as well as tornadoes in Taranaki, have dampened listed insurer Tower's full-year profit expectations.... According to the Insurance Council, severe weather in the North Island would cost the industry $70 million in related claims... Recent extreme weather events were an issue for the whole industry... Flannagan has previously said he expected premiums to rise, because most general insurers were losing money as premiums were insufficient to cover claims which appeared to be rising as a result of unusual weather events.

Stormy weather may put the lid on weekend plans
NZ Herald Thursday August 09, 2007
... Meteorologists have issued wind and rain warnings for much of the South Island for Friday and Saturday. A very deep depression over the Southern Ocean was expected to maintain a broad swathe of west to northwest winds over New Zealand for the next few days, MetService spokesman Bob McDavitt said... "Our warnings are currently forecasting rain amounts of 250 to 350mm in the Westland ranges during Friday and Saturday, and wind gusts of 120kmh for exposed inland parts of Southland, Otago and Canterbury... Mr McDavitt said the amounts of rain forecast were unusually large and would cause significant spillover into the headwaters of Otago and Canterbury rivers.

Wild weather
NZ Herald Sunday August 12, 2007
Hurricane-force winds and heavy rain hit parts of the country yesterday. Gusts snapped power poles near Wanaka, and the Rimutaka Hill Rd, between Wellington and Wairarapa, was closed mid-afternoon after a car was blown into a bank and reports of trucks being shunted about by strong and unpredictable gusts. Winds of up to 140km/h were recorded on the Wairarapa coast. Fiordland received 260mm of rain in 24 hours, and a heavy rain warning remained in force for the West Coast of the South Island and lower North Island last night... The Met Service said the worst of the weather would reach central New Zealand by midnight last night, with gales in Wellington and Wairarapa easing by the early hours of today. [...]

Extreme weather year costs NZ dear
NZ Herald Friday January 11, 2008
Last year's topsy-turvy mix of droughts, floods and tornadoes proved costly for New Zealand.
The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research yesterday released its 2007 national climate summary, which highlighted the disastrous floods in Northland, droughts in the eastern North Island and destructive tornadoes and windstorms... Principal climate scientist Jim Salinger said the severe weather proved expensive for the country.
The North Island drought was thought to have sucked about $700 million out of the economy and insured losses from floods, frosts and wind damage were estimated at
about $100 million... The most disastrous floods for many decades had occurred in the Far North and Whangarei districts, especially in the Bay of Islands at the end of March, due to exceptionally high rainfall, from 250mm to more than 400mm. More Northland floods followed in July, with windstorms that also hit Auckland and the Coromandel... The most significant extreme event of the year was the extraordinary swarm of tornadoes that wreaked havoc throughout Taranaki over July 4-5 as active frontal bands crossed the country from the Tasman Sea... [...]

Minister in money plea for homeowners hit by floods
NZ Herald Tuesday July 29, 2008
Building and Construction Minister Shane Jones will take a package to the Cabinet next month recommending financial help for 25 Far North families whose properties were severely damaged or left unstable during two devastating floods last year... The householders are mostly those in the Kaeo, Totara North and Whangaroa areas whose homes were badly damaged or who have ongoing land stability problems from the July 10 flood and an earlier one in March... It had been decided that the minister, who comes from the Far North, would take a case directly to the Government on behalf of affected landowners in the belief that this should speed up relief and bring a financial resolution for the families involved, the spokesman said. 
Action on the issue follows a Far North visit by Prime Minister Helen Clark last week during which she went to Kaeo to look at what work had been done on flood mitigation since the deluge of last July.

COMMENT: More storms for 2008 - click here.


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