New Zealand And Australia Marine maritime distress emergency details and information How to make a may day call. Rescue Co ordination Centre Center New Zealand (RCCNZ) data and rescue area map and Australia rescue areas"> New Zealand And Australia Marine maritime distress emergency details and information How to make a may day call. Rescue Co ordination Centre Center New Zealand (RCCNZ) data and rescue area map and Australia rescue areas"> New Zealand And Australia Marine maritime distress emergency details and information How to make a may day call. Rescue Co ordination Centre Center New Zealand (RCCNZ) data and rescue area map and Australia rescue areas">




                                             



New Zealand Oceania Search and Rescue Co - Ordination Centers
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COASTAL WATERS NEW ZEALAND




Contact the Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ) using the details listed below.




24-hour emergency numbers



New Zealand (toll free): 0508 472 269 (0508 4 RCCNZ)

Call from outside of New Zealand: +64 4 577 8030

At sea, call the Maritime Operations Centre on VHF radio channel 16. They will pass your details onto RCCNZ.
You can use any number of means to communicate distress simultaneously. Distress alert by cellphone call: 111

Website for full details       Search and Rescue Co Ordination Centre.

Office hours for the Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand are 8am to 5pm each weekday.
Phone: +64 4 577 8034 Fax: +64 4 577 8041 Email: rccnz@maritimenz.govt.nz
Address: Avalon Business Centre Percy Cameron Street Avalon New Zealand






N.Z. Search and Rescue Area Map And website.




OCEANGOING


How to make an emergency call or Send a MAYDAY Call

USE ONLY IF YOU ARE IN IMMINENT DANGER AND NEED IMMEDIATE HELP.


Activate distress beacon if carried. Wear lifejackets. Switch radio to Full Power.

1. VHF Ch 16 or SSB 2182, 4125, 6215, 8291

2. MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY

3. THIS IS NAME OF VESSEL 3 TIMES

4. CALLSIGN OF THE VESSEL ONCE

5. MAYDAY NAME OF VESSEL AND CALL SIGN

6. Vessel's position in degrees and minutes of latitude and longitude or bearing and distance from a well known geographical feature.

7. Nature of distress and kind of assistance required.

8. Any other information that may assist rescuers – number of persons on board, emergency details, description of vessel, liferaft, EPIRB, cellphone number.

9. OVER and on the side

10. Allow a short period for shore station to reply.

Repeat the distress call working through all the distress frequencies
If contact is made with a shore station, inform the station that you have activated your EPIRB and do NOT turn it off until advised by the rescue authority.

You can use any number of means to communicate distress simultaneously.
Distress alert by cellphone or Satphone call: 111





OTHER SEARCH and RESCUE CENTERS WEBSITES And OTHER USEFUL LINKS

| Guam Area Map | | Hololulu and America Samoa Area Map | | United States District 14 Guam and Hololulu Details |

| French Poylonesia Tahiti Area Maps + Google | | Australia's Area Map | | Obtain the latest Australia MSI via email |

| Receive by e-mail all weather warnings NZ |







Sea Rescue by Helicopter

Once a helicopter has been tasked, the time it takes to locate a vessel in distress and the effectiveness of its rescue effort depend largely on the cooperation of the vessel involved.
You should provide information to the radio station about your position, as accurately as possible [ latitude / longitude in degrees minutes and seconds or by bearing and distance
from a charted landmark ] a description of the vessel, the nature of your distress your communications capabilities [ such as VHF, SSB, EPIRB, cellphone or satellite telephone number,
if applicable. ] From the air, and especially if there are many other vessels in the area, it can be difficult for the helicopter crew to identify the vessel it is searching for, unless the vessel
uses a distinctive signal that can be clearly seen. To ensure the on-scene time for the helicopter is kept to a minimum, brief your crew on what to expect, activate your EPIRB, which has
a homing signal and, usually, a strobe light by day, use an orange smoke float distress flare, an orange square [ some are marked with a black ‘V’ ] a signal lamp or heliograph at night, use
a torch or a red hand-held flare [ do not fire a parachute flare when the helicopter is close by ] where possible, give cellphones or satellite telephone numbers to the co - ordinating agency
[ either RCCNZ or Police. ]





Working with a helicopter

When the helicopter arrives, change course to place the wind 30 deg on the port bow if possible, and maintain this new course at your standard speed. Lash or stow all loose gear that could
be blown about by the helicopter’s powerful down - draught. If possible, drop all sail and motor. Lash your boom [ s ] to the coachroof. Keep all unnecessary personnel out of the way while
the helicopter is winching. Allow the winch cable [ high-line ] to touch the water or the vessel before you handle it, to dissipate any build - up of static electricity. Do not allow the winch cable
to become attached [ or make fast ] to the vessel under any circumstances. Ensure the person being lifted is wearing a lifejacket, if possible. If the person is a patient, they should be made
as comfortable as possible and, if conscious, briefed and reassured about the rescue procedure.

At night, light the deck using lights or torches facing downwards. By day, indicate the apparent wind by using a flag or smoke [ as long as it will not impair the pilot’s visibility. ]
On reaching the shore, follow the instructions of the pilot or crewman, leaving the helicopter in a forward direction and keeping well clear of the tail rotor and engine exhausts.

Do exactly as the helicopter pilot tells you. The pilot will not put his crew and machine in any unnecessary danger.

Be aware that communications by radio [ or even person-to-person conversations ] are usually not possible when a helicopter is over head, due to the rotor blade motor noise.




                        
Animated globe graphic wind, direction and wind speeds.




     


Satellite Map for North West South Pacific Ocean - Tasman Sea - East Coast Australia - Fij i - Vanuatu - Click

Isobar map Coloured for North West South Pacific Ocean - Tasman Sea - East Coast Australia - Fij i - Vanuatu - Click 0600 hrs



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