Pages about EnglandPrevious Goathland to Grosmont (5 km)
Introduction
Danby
Lion Inn
Great Broughton
Osmotherley
Hawnby
Helmsley
Kirkbymoorside
Lastingham
Levisham
Goathland
Goathland Railway Station
Goathland Railway Station from the bracken path on the far side.

This really short hike along a pleasant disused railway line can be used to start your journey out of the North Yorkshire Moors. The adventurous can extend the hike, for example joining the last day of the Coast to Coast Walk from Grosmont to Robin Hood's Bay on the coast, hiking back up the Esk Valley to Danby to make a complete circuit or travelling down the valley to the famous and scenic Whitby town (ignore the tourists!).

Goathland Type Phone
Barnet House B&B 01947 896201
The Beacon B&B 01947 896409
Dale End Farm (Green End) B&B 01947 895371
Fairhaven Country Hotel B&B 01947 896361
Inn on the Moor Hotel 01947 896296
Jackson's Camp Site Camping 01947 896274
Mallyan Spout Hotel Hotel 01947 896206
Moorfields B&B 01947 896331
Prudom House B&B 01947 896368
Wheeldale Lodge YH 01947 896350
Transport
North Yorkshire Moors Railway 01751 472508
Baker's Taxis (Pickering) 01751 472200
Harrison's Taxis (Whitby) 01947 600606
White Rose Taxis (Whitby) 01947 604604

Hike through Goathland village from the church end (near Mallyan Spout Hotel), heading for the railway station. There may be time to visit the church to hunt out the six wooden mice left as the trademark of the wood-carver, Thompson of Kilburn. Just past the post office (on your right) there is a car park on the left. Take the lane to the left a few metres further along and walk along to the start of the historical rail trail. The footpath heads left on the disused railway track, with the back gardens of some cottages on the right. In another 400 metres meet and cross a minor road. The track heads quite steeply downhill for an old railway track, passing a cottage at the bottom of the slope. Continue for about a kilometre to a wooden finger post at a junction of paths. Turn right down to the pretty hamlet of Becks Hole. There is a public house here for morning coffee or something stronger if you had a late start.

Cross a bridge over Eller Beck and head straight onto a footpath when the lane turns sharply uphill. Nice woods lead the path back to the banks of the stream - now called Murk Esk since the junction between Eller and West Becks. The path soon emerges back onto the old railway which used to cross the Murk Esk on a bridge long since vanished. A couple of hundred metres of pleasant woodland walking leads back into fields.

The old railway line passes through woods just after Beck Hole
The old railway line passes through woods just after Beck Hole

A footbridge over Murk Esk appears in another 500 metres and the path continues along the top of the railway embankment between parallel fences for the next 1.25 kilometres. The modern railway line is met from the right, the path hops over a wall away from the line and through fields to a farm track. The farm track leads over a ridge and back to the railway line which enters the centre of Grosmont in another 100 metres.

If you take the train inland to Middlesborough then it will stop for a few minutes at Battersby Station. This is of interest since it is next to the junction with the old Rosedale line and in fact the train reverses direction - but don't worry, they change the points to send you off to Middlesborough. The empty ironstone wagons went south to the foot of an incline where they were hauled up onto the moor tops by the weight of full wagons coming down. The ruins of the Drum House that lodged the gear to do this are still visible just off the Cleveland Way

A tougher alternative to Grosmont is to follow paths on the other side of the Murk Esk dale. Start off from the Goathland Railway Station and cross the line to pass through the wooden pedestrian gate on the other side. Turn left on the path and climb above Mill Scar, finally dropping into a valley where the Eller Beck makes a loop. Ignore the ford but walk right along a stony track beside a stream. After 150 metres the track crosses the stream and climbs up the valley sides for about 250 metres. Turn left here to pass cottages and continue ahead towards an isolated field, separated from the main fields of Hawthorn Hill Farm. Curve down towards Hill Farm but turn right at a junction 100 metres before the farm buildings. This path curves around to a minor road above stone field walls. Turn right on the road for about 50 metres and take the path just after Hollin Garth farm. This leads to Green End farm and then through fields into Crag Cliff Wood (ignore a fork that descends into the dale). When the path emerges on a farm road, head downhill for 250 metres and then join a path into more woods on the right. This exits about 200 metres from the centre of Grosmont.


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