Auckland Region

 Abbotts Way lava flow humps. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Good example of lava flow identification by road topography. Humps where Abbotts Way road rises up onto the Mt Wellington lava flow that fills and blocked the valley creating Lake Waiatarua.

 Aiguilles Island and The Needles drowned ridgeline and pinnacles, northern Great Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: A rugged, drowned ridgeline of greywacke, dominated by pinnacles and islets. One of the most spectacular sections of coastline in the Auckland region.

 Albert Barracks wall. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Only remaining section of Albert Barracks wall. One of the earliest European structures built of local Auckland basalt.

 Algies Beach melange. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best exposures of the contact between Northland Allocthon and Miocene Waitemata Group rocks.

 Ambury Park lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Publicly most accessible lava cave in Auckland. A good example of a small lava cave.

 Ambury Park tree mould. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Good example of the mould of part of a large tree trunk that was caught up and rafted along by a lava flow from Mt Mangere. Easy public and educational access.

 Ambury Road lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: A complex 140 m long lava cave with two branches. Many flow features and well preserved, unusual lava stalagmites.

 Anawhata intrusion. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Well-exposed, and unusual mushroom-shaped andesite intrusion.

 Anawhata Beach. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Most pristine beach and associated sand dunes and dammed estuary on the west coast of the North Island. A scenic wonder.

 Arataki volcanic breccia and sandstone. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Best and most easily accessible exposure in eastern Waitakere Ranges illustrating the interfingering nature of the coarse volcanic breccias from the Waitakere Volcano with the volcanic-poor Waitemata Basin sandstone and siltstones.

 Asquith Avenue basalt. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Highly visible example of coarse columnar jointing in valley lava flow.

 Auckland Domain tuff exposure. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An accessible example of lithic tuff deposits.

 Auckland Domain volcano. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: A large tuff ring with a central scoria cone surrounded by alluvium (castle and moat), and an external, subsurface lava flow.

 Auckland Grammar School lava exposure. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: Excellent exposure of a well preserved, columnar jointed lava unit up to 25 m high. This is a popular venue for local rock climbers.

 Auckland University clock tower building. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Largest and most prominent building made of Mt. Somers limestone.

 Augustus Terrace former sea cliff. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Provides evidence of former extent of natural shoreline and sandstone cliffs that used to snake through downtown Auckland. Visual evidence of the extent of harbour reclamation in downtown Auckland. One of only four places in downtown Auckland where the old cliffline is publicly accessible and recognisable.

 Bald Rock eroded dike, Little Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: Best example of an eroded dike forming a prominent high ridge crest on Little Barrier Island and one of best in northern New Zealand.

 Barriball Road tuff ring and cone. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: One of South Auckland's larger tuff rings and a small scoria cone.

 Bartrum Bay submarine canyon wall and trace fossils, Muriwai. Map: R11; Classification A2. Significance: One of the very few exposures in the world where trace fossils are seen in a bathyal submarine canyon wall.

 Beachlands Fault. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best exposure of a fault active in the Quaternary in the Auckland area.

 Beachlands Pliocene plant beds. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best exposed and largest of very few Plicoene sedimentary rock exposures in the Auckland region. Provides best record of the vegetation cover of the region at the time, including numerous extinct seeds, leaves and logs, some partly silicified. Excellent examples of fluvial sedimentary features. Deposited in paleovalleys with unconformable contact on Waitemata Sandstone.

 Bean Rock reef and lighthouse, Waitemata Harbour. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: The reef is the highest point in the centre of Waitemata Harbour entrance adjacent to main channel. The reef is host to the iconic Bean Rock Lighthouse – the oldest wooden lighthouse and is the only surviving wave washed wooden cottage type lighthouse in New Zealand.

 Beehive Island, Kawau. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: Small "old hat" island surrounded by large intertidal platform with contrasting white shell sand high tide beach.

 Belmont Cliffs fault. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Conspicuous minor reverse fault clearly exposed in the cliff and on the shore platform. Penecontemporaneous with flysch deposition.

 Bethells dune-dammed swamp. Map: Q11; Classification: C1. Significance: The largest remaining swamp in the Auckland area - valley dammed by Holocene sand dune.

 Blackpool spilite. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Example of basement volcanics in the Auckland region.

 Blockhouse Bay sea stack. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Only sea stack of Waitemata Group sediment along the northern coastline of the Manukau Harbour.

 Blockhouse Bay to Green Bay cliffs. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent exposures of a wide range of features that characterise this part of the Waitemata Basin - thick and thin sandstone turbidite beds, graded and massive; thin-bedded and laminated siltstones and fine sandstone beds with carbonaceous laminae, ripples, trace fossils, microfaulting, sand fluidisation structures; large and small scale folding, vertical bedding, large and small scale normal, reverse and keystone faults; complex soft sediment deformation.

 Boggust Park Crater. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A well-preserved small explosion crater that has not been destroyed by urban sprawl.

 Bucklands Beach Holocene beach rock. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Beach rock containing basalt pebbles and fossil shells that provide evidence of nature of environment at Tamaki Estuary entrance before Rangitoto erupted and strong evidence of sea level being more than 1 m higher than present just a few thousand years ago.

 Carrads lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Lava cave about 90 m long.

 Cascade Falls. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Popular tourist attraction. Unusual waterfall eroded deep into the conglomerates in a narrow slot.

 Cave of a Thousand Press-ups. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: A network lava cave totalling about 270m in length.

 Clark's brickyard, Hobsonville. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: The largest and one of the oldest brickyards and pottery factories in west Auckland.

 Claude Stream basal Waitemata Group sediments, Whitford. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best exposed and most complete basal Waitemata sequence of limestone and greensand in southeast Auckland.

 Cochranes Gap accretionary lapilli. Map: R12; Classification: B2. Significance: Best example of large (5-20 mm diam) accretionary lapilli within a pyroclastic flow deposit in New Zealand.

 Cochranes Gap Quaternary sands. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Well exposed Quaternary coastal zone sediments. Predates the eruptions of Taranaki and Taupo volcanic centres and the subsequent current transport of black sands northwards along the coast. Type section for Awhitu formation.

 Constitution Hill former shore line. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Provides evidence of former extent of natural shoreline and steep slopes and cliffs that used to snake through downtown Auckland. Visual evidence of the extent of harbour reclamation in downtown Auckland. One of only four places in downtown Auckland where the old shoreline is publicly accessible and recognisable.

 Cornwallis Peninsula. Map R11; Classification: C3. Significance: The only substantial neck of land protruding southwards from the northern coastline of the Manukau Harbour.

 Cornwallis Peninsula cave sandstone fill. Map R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best and most easily accessible example of bedded iron sandstone partly filling a sea cave on the west side of Cornwallis Peninsula. Provides evidence of former extensive sand flat in this part of Manukau Harbour.

 Cornwallis Peninsula proximal volcanic-rich flysch. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Sequence of volcanic-rich flysch beds that accumulated close to the contemporaneous late Miocene Waitakere volcanoes.

 Crater Hill quarry exposures. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Excellent exposures of lithic tuff, basaltic lapilli, and crater rim collapse features. Useful teaching sites.

 Crater Hill tuff ring and crater. Map: R11; Classification: B4. Significance: One of the two best remaining explosion craters and tuff rings in Manukau City. Unique example in Auckland field of the cooled remnants of a lava lake that filled the crater and later withdrew down the vent. Two lava caves present.

 Cudlip Point deformed Waitemata Group rocks. Map: P10; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent and easily accessible example of structurally-deformed Waitemata Group sandstones and Parnell Grit.

 Cudlip Point Waitemata structures. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent exposures of structural deformation and Parnell Grit within Waitemata Group.

 Cutter Rock abandoned islet, Whatipu. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Prominent small islet that has been surrounded by build up of dune sands in 20th Century. Best example in region of contemporary (2000s) slab collapse of half the islet.

 Dispute Cove channelled flysch. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent exposure of a small channel within the basal Waitemata flysch.

 Double "U" Bay shallow marine Miocene fossils, Waiheke. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Rich shallow water macrofauna in deepening sequence. Type locality of a number of fossil molluscs. One of three rich Miocene fossil localities on Waiheke.

 East Pakatoa Island broken formation. Map: S11; Classification: B3. Significance: A world class example of broken formation exposed in extremely fresh high tidal exposures.

 Eastern Beach anticline. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: The best example in the Auckland region of an anticline visible in three dimensions. Of educational, as well as scientific importance.

 Eastern Beach relict chenier ridges: Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the last remnants in the Auckland area of relict shell ridges related to the post-glacial high sea-level. Easily accessible and clearly visible.

 Eastern Beach southern end Waitemata Sandstone cliffs: Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best educational and most easily accessible site for study of Waitemata Group sedimentary sequence in eastern Auckland. Good example of Parnell Grit and many sedimentary features.

 Easties lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Lava cave about 70 m long.

 Eden Gardens scoria and basalt dikes. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Example of a dike of lava passing laterally into a fracture with fused scoria on either side presumably as a result of melting from hot gases. Documents some of the processes that occurred within and at the base of the scoria cone during eruption of Mt Eden.

 Eden Mews tuff. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: By far the thickest exposure (30 m) of bedded tuff in Auckland City; only fresh exposure of Three Kings tuff ring; excellent display of slumping of tuff back into crater creating an internal unconformity.

 Fairy Falls and dikes. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of best examples of a waterfall in the Waitakeres, and the best place to see dikes in the eastern Waitakere Ranges.

 Farm Cove ignimbrite. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: One of two best exposures in the Auckland region of a rhyolitic ignimbrite flow deposit, showing that Auckland is within the range of superheated pyroclastic flows erupted from the centre of the North Island. The deposit here is 3 m thick and buries charred vegetation.

 Favona shell spit, Manukau Harbour. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Only shell-rich shoal in the otherwise mud-dominated tidal flats of northeastern Manukau Harbour.

 Fishermens Rock high-tide platform and sea cave, Muriwai. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Classic well-developed example of a wide high tide platform produced by more rapid erosion of cliff behind.

 Flat Top Hill Tangihua structure, Kaukapakapa. Map: Q10; Classification: B2. Significance: An example of structural deformation in southernmost mass of Tangihua Volcanics. Unusually large apophyllite and stilbite crystals exposed in quarry.

 Fort Hill andesitic breccia. Map: S10; Classification: C3. Significance: Best exposed example of middle Miocene andesitic breccia on Waiheke Island. Provides evidence to illustrate young age of formation of Hauraki Gulf and graben.

 Fossil Bay Miocene transgressive sequence, Waiheke Island. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Well exposed transgressive sequence onlapping greywacke basement and passing up from alluvial conglomerate through beach conglomerate to shelf fossiliferous mudstones. Rich shallow macrofaunas; type locality of many unusual species; also has reef corals in-situ.

 Frenchmans Cap, Pakatoa. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of a top-hat island.

 Gannet Rock red chert. Map: S10; Classification: C3. Significance: One of best exposed examples of red chert in the region.

 Goat Island Bay sediments, Leigh. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellently exposed basal sequence of Waitemata flysch overlying the basement. Type sequence of Pakiri Formation.

 Grants Island old hat. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: A small island surounded by broad intertidal rock platforms, giving it the classic "old hat" shape. One of the best examples of an "old hat" in New Zealand.

 Greenlane-Ascot roads lava flow front. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: City-wide significance, as one of the best and most easily accessible examples of the edge of an extensive lava flow field. Shows northeast extent of the large One Tree Hill lava flow field which created the Ellerslie racecourse swamp between it and the Waitemata Sandstone ridge of Ladies Mile.

 Gribblehurst Park lava flows junction. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Significant as the junction between two of the isthmus's major lava flows - from Mt Eden and Three Kings. Unusual example of depression between the two flows formed in the "shadow" of a low Waitemata Sandstone hill that separates the flows upflow.

 Grotto Street pond. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Unusual circular depression in side of One Tree Hill lava flow, in existence for thousands of years as a pond as it is floored with diatomite. Probably formed by a collapsed sector of lava flow roof.

 Hamlins Hill rhyolitic tuff. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Best inland exposure of rhyolitic tuff in Auckland City, sitting on top of hill suggests airfall or pyroclastic flow, not reworked.

 Hamlins Hill sandstone ridges. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best remaining example of a sandstone ridge complex - one of the main landform elements of Auckland City isthmus. Includes exposure of sandstones near access track.

 Hampton Park scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A small complete volcanic centre, (the site of Smale's Church, St John, which was built in 1862) with a tuff ring coalescing with the Otara Hill tuff ring and a lava flow to the SW.

 Harataonga Bay conglomerate, Great Barrier. Map: T08; Classification: C2. Significance: Only known occurrence of granite-bearing conglomerate in Waipapa Terrane greywacke in northern New Zealand.

 Harbour View Pleistocene terraces. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Well-defined landform with moderately high educational and scientific value. One of the last remaining undeveloped Pleistocene terrace surfaces around the Waitemata Harbour. Visually prominent to car passengers on NW Motorway.

 Hays Stream cliffs limestone, Papakura. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: Best exposure and reference section for the Papakura Limestone within the basal Waitemata Group.

 Helena Rubinstein lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: A branched lava cave totalling about 320 m in length, with many lava rolls.

 Hillsborough Rd tuff. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Easily accessible example of bedded tuff and bomb impact depressions in more distal part of Three Kings tuff ring. Weathered examples of chalazoidites.

 Hobsonville complex landslide. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Complex landslide consisting of coastal slip and flow occurring in one of the few places where pumice silts exist at sea level.

 Hopua explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A small explosion crater and low tuff ring. Considerably damaged by reclamation and motorway. Breached by the sea and filled with marine sediments.

 Hopua tuff exposure. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Easily accessible example of bedded tuff and lava bombs. Only fresh exposure of Hopua tuff.

 Hoteo hogback bluffs and unconformity. Map: Q09; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of incised meandering river in northern New Zealand. Meanders are inherited from when river was flowing over a flat plain and has since incised into the uplifted plain.

 Hoteo River incised meanders. Map: Q09; Classification: C3. Significance: 4 kms of prominent thick sandstone bluffs visible from SH 1 2-3 km south of Wellsford. Largest and most prominent hogback ridge in the Auckland region. Well exposed, regionally significant unconformity within the Waitemata Group.

 Hunua Falls volcanic neck. Map: S12; Classification: C3. Significance: A waterfall with a 30 m drop over a basalt plug intruded up a fault line - an unusual feature. Good exposure of lava bombs.

 Ihumatao Pleistocene buried fossil forests. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Best example in New Zealand of a fossilised mature kauri forest, and of a fossil forest, buried and preserved beneath volcanic ash.

 Ingram Road III tuff ring. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Fairly well defined tuff ring remnant.

 Island Bay chert-pillow lava sequence. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Easily accessible, well-exposed section through fresh Waipapa greywacke sequence containing pillow lavas and chert. Differs from most of the greywacke sequences on Waiheke that are dominantly thick sandstone. Two sequences separated by thrust.

 Jordans Road Miocene fossils. Map: Q10; Classification: C3. Significance: Best preserved and most diverse bathyal molluscan and coral fauna in early Miocene of northern New Zealand.

 Kaitoke Beach dunefield, Great Barrier. Map: T09; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best remaining examples of a relatively unmodified active dunefield anywhere on Auckland's eastern coastline.

 Kaitoke and Peach Tree Springs, Great Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C2. Significance:

 Kaitoke Swamp. Map: T09; Classification: C2. Significance: Largest freshwater swamp in Auckland region.

 Kaiwhare blowhole, South Piha. Map: Q11; Classification: C1. Significance: One of the best blowholes on the North Island west coast. Excellent example of sea erosion along fractures forming a 20 m-long tunnel through a high ridge. Tourist attraction.

 Kakamatua Inlet, Cornwallis. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Least modified sediment-filled tidal bay and estuary on the Manukau Harbour.

 Karamatura delta, Huia. Map: Q11; Classification: B2. Significance: Only delta in the Manukau Harbour. Only classical delta shape along the west coast of the North Island associated with a stream or river mouth.

 Karamatura, Marama & Mt Donald McLean bluffs and exfoliation domes. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Easily accessible and viewed catchment of steep cliffs and exfoliation domes.

 Karekare active sand dunes. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Easily accessible area of active sand dunes in centre of bayhead fill.

 Karekare Falls. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Spectacular waterfall seen from bottom of Lone Kauri Rd and picnic area at base. Most easily accessible water fall in the Waitakere Ranges.

 Karekare south volcanic planar-stratified conglomerate. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Most easily accessible example of planar-stratified volcanic conglomerate that forms a large part of the Waitakere Volcano in the Waitakere Ranges. Also contains an excellent example of a forked intrusive dike.

 Kariotahi Quaternary sands. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Well exposed Quaternary coastal sediments showing the beginning of black sand deposition, with the current transport northwards of ilmenite- and magnetite-rich sediments, following the commencement if volcanism in the central North Island and Taranaki.

 Kawakawa Bay deformed chert beds. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Gives a useful indication of the melange nature of Waipapa Terrane.

 Kawau Island copper mine and pumphouse. Map: R09; Classification: B2. Significance: Site of first underground mining in New Zealand (manganese) in the 1840s. Changed to copper in 1844. Most productive coppermine in the country.

 Kawau Island pillow lavas. Map: R09; Classification: B3. Significance: One of the best examples of tubular pillow lavas in New Zealand.

 Kawau Island smelter site. Map: R09; Classification: C1. Significance: Historic ruins of copper smelter associated with this early New Zealand mining endeavour.

 Kennedy Park deformed Waitemata strata. Map: R10; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent and easily accessible exposures of deformed Waitemata strata - faults and folds.

 Kepa Rd landslip. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Best example of a largely intact slow landslide within Auckland City. Unusual example of volcanic ash plastered on side of existing sandstone ridge on inside of Orakei Basin crater.

 Keyhole Rock, Anawhata. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of wind and salt erosion producing small opening through sea stack.

 Kidds Beach Pliocene conglomerate. Map: R12; Classification: C1. Significance: Best and most extensive exposures of Pliocene jasper and quartz-rich conglomerate that provide evidence for the former existence of a west-flowing 'Clevedon River" sourced from the Coromandel and Waiheke area and depositing in the Manukau Harbour.

 Kidds Beach shell spits. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: Largest area and best example of actively accreting shell spits in the Manukau Harbour.

 Kitekite Falls. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of highest and most easily accessible falls in Waitakere Ranges. Exposure of three dikes.

 Kitenui lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: One of the longest and best preserved lava caves under Auckland city. Some of the best lava stalagmites on the floor.

 Kiwi Esplanade pahoehoe lava flow. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Best example of pahoehoe lava surfaces in New Zealand.

 Kohuora explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A low-profile, double-lobed explosion crater. Only one of this shape in the Auckland Field. Despite subdivision and modification, the gross shape of the crater is still visible.

 Kotanui Island stack, Whangaparaoa Peninsula. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Prominent and well defined sea stack eroded out of Waitemata Group rocks.

 Kuataika rocky peak. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of a rocky, partly exfoliation peak in Piha Formation Conglomerates. Forms most prominent high point in northwest Waitakere Ranges.

 Ladder lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An unmodified publicly accessible lava cave about 64 m long. Educational value.

 Lake Okaihau dune-dammed lake, Muriwai. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: A good and easily publicly-accessible example of a small dune-dammed lake in an eroded small valley.

 Lake Ototoa dune lake. Map: Q10; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of freshwater lake between sand dunes

 Limestone Point basal Waitemata Group sediments, Motuihe Island. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Good exposures of rapid lateral shallow water facies changes within Waitemata Group burying irregular greywacke shoreline. Only limestone karst area in Auckland region, between Pokeno and Brynderwyns. A small example of well developed coastal karst.

 Lino lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Lava cave about 90 m long.

 Lion Rock neck. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: A large rocky stack with a lion-shaped profile. Well exposed volcanic neck fill, with evidence of subaerial Lone Kauri Formation eruption. Iconic landform of region.

 Little Rangitoto lava flow. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only exposure of the lava flow that flowed down the valley into Hobson Bay area.

 Little Rangitoto rootless lava flows. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of rootless lava flows exposed in the Auckland Volcanic field.

 Liverpool Street tuff exposure and chalazoidites. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Most easily accessible and one of best exposures of bedded tuff in suburban Auckland. Includes bed rich in chalazoidites and small slump faults.

 Lynfield cliffs Waitemata Group section. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent exposures of a wide range of features that characterise this part of the Waitemata Basin on the lower flanks of the Waitakere Volcano - volcaniclastic Parnell Grit debris flow beds; thick and thin sandstone turbidite beds, graded and massive; thin-bedded and laminated siltstones and fine sandstone beds with carbonaceous laminae, ripples, trace fossils, microfaulting, water expulsion structures; large and small scale folding, vertical bedding, large and small scale normal, reverse and thrust faults; complex soft sediment deformation.

 Mahurangi Island old hat islet, Waiwera. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Prominent, subconical small islet surrounded by extensive intertidal platform (brim) of eroded Waitemata Sandstone. One of several classically old-hat-shaped profile islets along coast north of Auckland.

 Mahurangi North Parnell Grits. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Best exposed sequence of more than one Parnell Grit bed within the Waitemata Basin.

 Man o' War Passage. Map: S08; Classification: B2. Significance: Best example in region of narrow sea passage between cliffed shorelines. Spectacular scenic feature of tourist value.

 Mangatu Stream Parnell Grits, Hoteo. Map: Q09; Classification: C3. Significance: Thickest sequence of volcanic mass flow deposits within Waitemata Basin, well exposed.

 Mangere Lagoon explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C4. Significance: A large, low-profile tuff ring with a small, central scoria cone. Invaded by rising sea level to form a tidal lagoon.

 Maori Bay sea cave. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Well visited, easily accessible, typical sea cave with access at both ends at low tide.

 Mathesons Bay basal Waitemata Group thrusts-cut unconformity and Miocene reef corals. Map: R09; Classification: B2. Significance: Easily accessible, well exposed educational stop showing onlap of early Miocene Waitemata sediments on Waipapa Group. An excellent example of thrusting. Richest locality in new Zealand for the unusual chaliciform reef corals.

 Mathesons Bay black calcite. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: A good exposure of large black calcite crystals.

 Mathesons Bay old hat islet and Miocene eagle-ray burrows. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of an old hat islet in the Cape Rodney area north of Auckland. Well-exposed eagle-ray burrows in basal Waitemata conglomerate.

 McLaughlin Mt and Matukuturua Stonefields. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Quarried remains of scoria cone can be seen from all over Auckland and marks the southernmost volcano in the Auckland Volcanic Field. The only significant remains of the three volcanoes in the Wiri area. The Stonefields preserve some of the lava flows from McLaughlin Mt and also includes a small crater lake/wetland inside a small remaining arc of tuff ring. One of the two largest and best areas of pre-European horticultural stonework gardens in the Auckland region.

 Medlands Stream fossil leaves. Map: T09; Classification: C2. Significance: Source of some of the best preserved Miocene fossil leaves and freshwater mussels in New Zealand.

 Meola Creek and estuary. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example in Auckland volcanic field of a stream that has been displaced by a lava flow and now runs around the meandroid edge of the flow. One of the least modified sections of a natural stream in Auckland City isthmus.

 Mercer Bay chimney and sea cave. Map: Q11; Classification: B2. Significance: An outstanding example of a sea cave that has eroded into the cliff and then vertically upwards along joint planes, partly in a dike, to form a 100 m high chimney opening near the top of the cliffs. Also includes an excellent example of a narrow sea tunnel eroded along fractures.

 Mercer Bay honeycomb stack. Map: Q11; Classification: C1. Significance: Most unusually shaped and patterned stack in the Auckland region. Rare example of a sea stack with its upper part moulded by honeycomb weathering.

 Mercer Bay sea cliffs. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Highest sea cliffs in the Auckland region surrounding one of the most remote beaches on the Waitakere coast.

 Miners Head copper mine, Great Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: Relics of early attempt to mine copper on Great Barrier Island.

 Mission Bay relict foredune. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Marks former location of beach, probably in early Holocene when sea level c. 1 m higher. Built out from end of spur on east end.

 Mission Bay thrust and Bastion Pt cliffs. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best exposed example of Waitemata Group strata in the cliffs of the Tamaki Drive, and most interesting structural feature in these tourist cliffs.

 Mokoroa Falls, Waitakere. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of best examples in the region of a waterfall formed by a hard erosion-resistant sandstone.

 Mortimer Pass lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: The only rift cave known in Auckland, about 35 m long.

 Motor Holdings lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Lava cave about 114 m long, containing some lava rolls.

 Motukaha gravel tombolo, Waiheke. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Best example of a narrow gravel tombolo in the region.

 Motukaraka Island sand tombolo, Beachlands. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Longest tombolo in the Auckland region. Unusually narrow for its length. Well defined and easily viewed feature.

 Motuketekete Island Waitemata Group Miocene basal limestone. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: One of only three known localities in New Zealand where reef corals are preserved in growth position. Only occurrence of early Miocene limestone between Auckland and Bream Tail. Good exposure of sequence passing up into flysch.

 Motukorea (Browns Island) Holocene coastal terrace. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Least modified extensive coastal terrace of mid Holocene age in the Auckland region. Significant in documenting the Holocene sea level in the region.

 Motukorea (Browns Island) scoria cone with motukoreaite. Map: R11; Classification: A3. Significance: Motukorea is a whole volcanic system in miniature and is the least damaged of Auckland's volcanoes. Partly submerged by rising post-glacial sea level. Type locality for the mineral motukoreaite.

 Motuora Island Parnell Grit. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: One of best and largets exposures of a Parnell Grit bed. Contains large rip-up blocks of upslope sedimentary facies.

 Motutapu folded chert. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: The best known and most easily accessible exposure of tightly folded chert beds in the Waipapa Group.

 Motutapu Island coastal features. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Well developed shore platforms and stack cut in greywacke, Parnell Grit and Waitemata sandstone.

 Motutapu Island human footprints. Map: R10; Classification: B1. Significance: Fossil human footprints and dog paw prints preserved in Rangitoto Ash. Only known archaeological evidence of people witnessing and being affected by an eruption (Rangitoto) in the Auckland volcanic field. Unique in New Zealand.

 Motutapu Miocene basal Waitemata Group contact, with fossil giant barnacles. Map: R10; Classification: B2. Significance: Classic locality for historic and educational reasons for showing the sedimentary relationship of the early Miocene Waitemata Group to the underlying basement, and the character of the early Miocene coastline. Classic type locality of the giant barnacle Bathylasma aucklandica. Barnacle plates sit in sandstone near foot of fossil greywacke stack on which they grew. Diverse barnacle fauna in adjacent Parnell Grit bed. High educational significance for Auckland geology classes.

 Motutara volcanic sandstone islet, Muriwai. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of a high vertical-sided islet eroded out of volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks on the west coast of Northland-Auckland.

 Mt Albert scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Large scoria cone overlying obscured tuff ring remnants; extensive lava flows in three quadrants. Some ash mantles.

 Mt Calm volcanic cone. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Small volcanic cone.

 Mt Cambria footprint and scoria exposures. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Footprint and lower unquarried slopes of Mt Cambria scoria cone - one of three volcanoes in Devonport. Scoria exposures provide only insight into rocks of the volcano.

 Mt Eden jail. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the most impressive early Auckland structures built of local basalt.

 Mt Eden scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: A large scoria cone with a deep, well preserved, circular crater. Many good lava outcrops are exposed within the extensive lava fields.

 Mt Hobson basalt (S Motorway). Map: R11; Classification: C5. Significance: Only exposure that provides visual evidence of lava flows from Mt Hobson. Since December 2009 concealed by retaining wall.

 Mt Hobson cliffs and pinnacles, Great Barrier Island. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: Scenically spectacular cliffs and pinnacles eroded in rhyolite domes and forming highest points on Great Barrier Island.

 Mt Hobson scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A well preserved small scoria cone (steepest on the NE side), with minor lava flows.

 Mt Mangere scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: One of the best examples in the Auckland field of a large, well-preserved scoria cone with a breached crater. Within the crater the lava plug (surrounded by gas vents) is unique in the Auckland field. Also unique in the Auckland field is a deep, secondary, explosion crater in the rim of the main scoria cone.

 Mt Richmond scoria cones. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A volcanic centre with a large, swampy, tuff ring (partially intact) and a nest of small, cratered scoria cones (now partly quarried away).

 Mt Roskill scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A simple scoria cone that almost buried the original tuff ring. A small lava flow down-valley to the NW.

 Mt Royal lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Excellent example of a lava cave, with the largest and best developed lava stalactites and dribbles in New Zealand. Also several excellent examples of gas chimneys.

 Mt Smart volcano. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only undamaged remains of one of Auckland's iconic scoria cones. Remaining lower slopes define the original size and shape of the cone. Source of large area of lava flows to the south.

 Mt St John scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A reasonably well preserved, simple scoria cone with an ephemeral crater pond.

 Mt Victoria scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Breached scoria cone (on a ridge top) with lava flows, but no evidence of tuff deposits.

 Mt Wellington fused cowpat bombs. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Best example of cowpat bombs in Auckland Volcanic field, and uniquely large (up to 0.8 m across and 0.2 m thick) and partially fused together to create this deposit on the crest of the crater.

 Mt Wellington scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: The largest scoria cone in the Auckland Volcanic Field. The cone (Maungarei) also has notable archeological significance.

 Muriwai Miocene fauna, Maori Bay. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Unusual, bathyal molluscan fauna and also a conglomerate bed with redeposited shallow water reef corals.

 Muriwai pillow lavas, Maori Bay. Map: Q11; Classification: A2. Significance: Among the best exposed and preserved pillow lavas in the world, interbedded with fossiliferous sediments that give an indisputable bathyal depth.

 Muriwai, Powell Bay Miocene fossils. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Unusual bathyal molluscan fauna, mainly turrids.

 Muriwai to Te Henga high terrace. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Most prominent uplifted marine terraces on the west coast of Auckland. Record timing and amount of Quaternary uplift in this part of the region.

 Muriwai uplifted Pleistocene water-laid sandstone. Map: Q11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only known exposure of water-laid sandstone within Pleistocene Kaihu Group at northern end of Waitakeres. Provides evidence of uplift since deposition at water-table level about 1 million years ago.

 Muriwai volcaniclastic sediments. Map: Q11; Classification: A3. Significance: Well exposed in coastal cliff and intertidal platforms. Best exposures in New Zealand of submarine canyons and channels filled with volcaniclastic sediments.

 Musick Point cannon-ball concretions. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the best and most easily accessible examples in the Auckland region of these spherical concretions, both loose on the foreshore and embedded in the rocks.

 Musick Point overthrust. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Overthrust fold involving flysch beds.

 Musick Point peninsula. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance:

 Narrow Neck structural discordance. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A classic example of structural discordance.

 New North Rd lava cave (Hebron College). Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: One of the better examples of a meandering lava cave located within Mt Albert lava flow field. Some of best lava rolls in Auckland lava caves.

 Nihotupu Gorge volcaniclastic flysch, Waitakeres. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Best exposed section through this interfingering lateral facies boundary between Waitemata basin flysch and Waitakere volcaniclastic pile.

 Nihotupu pillow lavas, Waitakeres. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Well exposed easternmost pillow lavas in Waitakere Group.

 Ninepin Rock volcanic neck and sea stack. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: An example of an eroded volcanic neck combining intrusive tongues of lava and agglomerate fill with bombs. Excellent example of a coastal stack.

 North Cornwallis Holocene high-stand terrace. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best remaining examples of a Holocene high-stand marine terrace in the Manukau Harbour.

 North Head scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Scoria cone with good exposures of basaltic tuff in tunnels and along the coast.

 North Kaheno Cove folds, Rotoroa Island. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent fresh exposures of multi-phased folds in thin-bedded argillite and greywacke.

 North Pararaha Cliffs submarine slide. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best exposure of large submarine slide on slope of large early Miocene Waitakere volcano. Largest slide deposit in Miocene rocks of northern New Zealand.

 North Piha stranded sea-cave and stalactites. Map: Q11; Classification: B1. Significance: Only known carbonate stalactites in volcanogenic rocks in North Island. Associated with excellent, easily accessible sea-cave formed in non-calcareous, gritty andesitic sandstone of the Piha Formation. The cave is now stranded behind sand dunes by coastline aggradation.

 North Te Henga coastal features. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Outstanding cluster of a cliffed rocky finger-like headland, two cliffed rocked inlets, high tide rock platforms, sea tunnels that pass right through a point, incised narrow embayments and parallel-sided guts, all eroded out of volcanic conglomerate.

 North-west Motorway lava flow, Western Springs. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of best and most commonly seen cuttings through a lava flow in Auckland City. Provides good visual evidence of route of Auckland's longest lava flow from Three Kings to Meola Reef via Western Springs.

 Number 104 Landscape Road Lava Cave. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An excellent example of a lava cave.

 Oaia pillow-lava islet, Maori Bay. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Unusual round-topped islet and only one existing more than 100 m off the west coast of Auckland. Prominent landmark for thousands of visiting tourists.

 Oakley Creek and waterfall. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Largest and highest waterfall in Auckland city. One of least modified streams and small stream valleys on isthmus. Example of stream that was shifted to the side of the valley when a Mt Albert lava flow came down its original valley.

 Ocean Beach basal Waitemata Group sediments, Motuihe Island. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Easily accessible, well-exposed cliffs showing deepening section of basal Waitemata strata burying greywacke stack.

 Ohaka Head dike swarm. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best exposed dike swarm in Waitakere Ranges.

 Okahu Bay bayhead fill. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best preserved example of an early Holocene bayhead fill in Auckland City. Obvious evidence of higher early Holocene sea level.

 Okura River estuary shell spit. Map: R10; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent example of the accumulation of a single shell spit inside the entrance to a tidal estuary.

 One Tree Hill scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: A large complex scoria cone with extensive lava fields mantled by tephra from the Three Kings volcano. Two large horse-shoe craters and one circular crater. This centre has features of archeological significance including terracing, food storage pits, living sites, and fortifications.

 Onehunga springs (Bycroft Reserve). Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only remaining visual evidence for the Onehunga freshwater aquifer system that flows within the base of the One Tree Hill lava flows and naturally upwells near the shore at this locality. Freshwater springs overflows naturally flowing out from beneath lava flows regionally rare, but not in excellent condition.

 O'Neill Bay crater. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the best exposed craters in the Waitakere region.

 Onepoto explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A large, prominent explosion crater with steep inner face. The volcanic activity overwhelmed a standing, mature kauri forest (tuff moulds encountered during quarrying).

 Oneroa Beach Miocene fossils. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of only three localities on Waiheke Island containing well-preserved early Miocene fossils.

 Orakei Basin tuff ring. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: A large, conspicuous tuff ring within a closely populated suburb. It has been breached by a stream and invaded by rising sea level. Tuff mantles that rest on soft beds or steep slopes adjacent to the crater are prone to slumping when saturated.

 Orakei Greensand Miocene fossils. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Historically important locality collected by Hochstetter in 1859. Type locality of several Mollusca and especially of numerous Foraminifera described by Karrer in 1864.

 Oruawharo hyaloclastite. Map: Q09; Classification: B3. Significance: One of the two best examples of hyaloclastite and associated vent complex in the Miocene volcanics of Northland and Auckland. Well exposed.

 Otahuhu Creek islet. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only island in Tamaki Estuary. Islets rare in Auckland City.

 Otau cone. Map: S12; Classification: C3. Significance: Small volcanic centre on the Moumoukai Fault.

 Otuataua lava flows. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: One of the least modified remaining areas of lava flows in the Auckland Field. Also contains prehistoric and historic stone mounds and walls.

 Paerata tuff ring cliffs. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the best exposures of tuff in South Auckland Volcanic Field.

 Paihia Rd lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: One of the best preserved examples of a small meandering (U-shaped) lava cave located within the One Tree Hill lava flow field. Some of the best lava rolls and benches in Auckland's lava caves.

 Pakihi Island spit. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the longest intertidal spits in the Auckland Region.

 Pakiri Beach and dunes. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: Longest unmodified beach on the east coast of the Auckland region. Unusually rich in white quartz in Hauraki Gulf.

 Pakuranga swamp vegetation fossilised beneath volcanic ash. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Only known example of vegetation fossilised beneath Panmure Basin volcanic ash and only example of swamp vegetation preserved by volcanic ash in Auckland.

 Panatahi columnar jointed islet, Karekare. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Only example of a columnar-jointed dacite islet on the west coast of New Zealand. Prominent and admired landform at southern end of Karekare Beach.

 Panmure Basin explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: An explosion crater and associated tuff ring that is still relatively complete. Naturally breached to form a tidal lagoon.

 Papakanui dune field and spit, Kaipara South Head. Map: Q09; Classification: B2. Significance: A large area of mobile dune fields and 3 km long active sandspit.

 Pararaha Gorge and exfoliation domes. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best area of rounded small exfoliation dome peaks in the Waitakere Ranges cut by incised Pararaha Gorge.

 Parakai Hot Springs. Map: Q10; Classification: C1. Significance:

 Paratutae to Little Huia high-cliffed coastline. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Iconic stretch of high, partly cliffed and partly forest-covered pinnacled coastline, probably an eroded fault scarp forming north side of Manukau Harbour entrance.

 Paratutae wave-cut notch and tombolo. Map: Q11; Classification: B2. Significance: Best example of a wave-cut notch on the west coast of Auckland.

 Parnell Baths Parnell Grit. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Type locality for Parnell Grit, an important educational site.

 Patauoa Creek mouth Last Interglacial terrace, Kaipara. Map: Q09; Classification: C3. Significance: One of best examples of 6m high coastal terrace formed during Last Interglacial sea level high.

 Peach Hill cone. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: The most easily recognized volcanic cone on the Drury Fault, with numerous basalt boulders on surface.

 Penrose basalt (SE Highway). Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Highly visible example of coarse columnar jointed lava. Most accessible and freshest cuttings through distal parts of lava flow from Mt Wellington, 5 km away.

 Pigeon Mountain scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Only volcanic landform in Pakuranga. A prominent local landform despite damage by quarrying. A small explosion crater just outside the NW rim of the tuff ring.

 Piha gorge. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Best example of a gorge in the Waitakere Ranges. Narrow deeply incised gorge, 5-20 m wide, with vertical walls cut in breccia, 50-100 m high.

 Pohutukawa Flat rock fall, Little Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: A large rockfall collapsed from high coastal cliffs forming a 50 hectare rocky flat.

 Pohutukawa Point chert stack, Waiheke. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Most easily accessible and one of best examples of red chert on Waiheke. Here the harder rock forms the point and an impressive little stack on the end.

 Point England accretionary lapilli (chalazoidites). Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: An exposure of rhyolitic, co-ignimbritic deposits from the Taupo Volcanic Zone.

 Point England interglacial terraces. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the last remaining sites in Auckland where sets of terraces are preserved and easily viewed.

 Pokorua dune-dammed lake. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of a dune-dammed lake on Awhitu Peninsula.

 Pollen Island mudflats and trace fossils. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Best remaining largely unmodified area of salt marsh, mangroves and estuarine and harbour mud flats in the Waitemata Harbour. Largest salt marsh and meadow in Auckland isthmus. Has some of the best examples of active shell spits. Best example in New Zealand of natural casts of snapping shrimp burrow systems.

 Pollens brickyard and pottery site. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best remaining sites of early European brickmaking and pottery yards in West Auckland.

 Pollock shell spit and estuary, Awhitu Peninsula. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: Longest shell spit sheltering the largest estuary in the Awhitu-Waiuku area. One of the best examples of a shell spit in the Manukau Harbour. It has an unusual hook at its distal (southern) tip.

 Ponga Road volcanic cone. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Small volcanic cone.

 Ponui Island pillow lavas and spherulitic chert. Map: S11; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent example of thick pile of pillow lava flow within Waipapa Terrane greywackes. One of best examples of thermally metamorphosed spherulitic red cherts in New Zealand. One of best examples of thrust contact at base of accretionary wedge slice within Waipapa Terrane.

 Port Fitzroy islets. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: Scenically attractive rocky islets in Port Fitzroy at entrance to Kiwiriki Bay.

 Pt Chevalier Waitemata Group sedimentary structures. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best exposures of Waitemata Group strata in central Auckland city area, for educational purposes.

 Pudding Island old hat, Mahurangi. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Prominent, pudding-shaped small islet surrounded by extensive intertidal platform (brim) of eroded Waitemata Sandstone. One of several classically old hat-shaped islets along coast north of Auckland.

 Puhinui Craters. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A cluster of three small explosion craters and surrounding tuff rings, unique in the Auckland Volcanic Field.

 Puhinui Reserve salt marsh and shell spits, Manukau Harbour. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Largest salt marsh on shores of Manukau Harbour and one of four largest in Auckland region. Actively accreting shell spits at south end.

 Puka Street grotto. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best preserved example in Auckland City of a deep, steep-sided depression within a lava flow formed by roof collapse, presumably over still-flowing lava inside, which rafted the collapsed debris away.

 Pukaki Lagoon tuff ring and crater. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: One of the best two remaining examples of an explosion crater and tuff ring in Manukau City. A large, well-preserved explosion crater and surrounding tuff ring with minimal urban development.

 Pukapuka Quarry unconformity. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: One of very few exposures of sedimentary contact of Waitematas on allochthon.

 Pukeiti scoria cone and lava field. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: The only remaining example of a small, cratered scoria cone in the Auckland field and the only remaining, largely intact scoria cone of four originally in this area.

 Pukematekeo (Sugarloaf) basalt intrusion, Matakana. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: Best and westernmost example of an intrusion of Ti Pt basalt forming a prominent ridge-top knoll.

 Pukekohe East tuff ring. Map: R12; Classification: B3. Significance: The best preserved tuff ring in the South Auckland volcanic field.

 Puketutu Island intrusive lava flow. Map: R12; Classification: B1. Significance: Best example in New Zealand of a lava flow intruding and baking soft sediment, pushing up an anticline of tuff and intruding as dikes along the fractured anticline crest.

 Puketutu volcano. Map: R11; Classification: C4. Significance: One of only three examples in the Auckland volcanic field, where a complete volcano consisting of tuff ring remnants, scoria cones and lava fields are intact, undeveloped and able to be protected. One of only three island volcanoes in the field and only one in the Manukau Harbour.

 Pupuke explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A large, compound explosion crater with a fresh water lake (Lake Pupuke). Lava flows mantled with tuff. Many tree moulds (stumps and logs) are exposed in the lava on the coast.

 Pupuke Rowing Club volcaniclastic exposure (Smale's Quarry). Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: A well preserved example of phreatic to strombolian activity as represented by volcaniclastic sediments.

 Purchas Hill scoria cones. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Scoria and ash bed exposure important for understanding relationship with Mt Wellington. Only remains of Purchas Hills double scoria cones. Located on junction between the two cones.

 Purewa Estuary. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of a small, mud and mangrove-filled estuary on isthmus. Estuary played important role in geological history of Orakei Basin. Unmodified, near pristine drowned stream valley estuaries rare in Auckland city.

 Rakino greywacke and basal Waitemata scetion. Map: R10; Classification: C2. Significance: Good example of chert and grey argillite sequence; well-rounded argillite boulder beach; and basal Waitemata sequence in small depression.

 Rakino Island prehistoric quarry. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: One of the best and most extensive examples of a prehistoric greywacke fine sandstone and argillite quarry and working area.

 Rakitu Island Black and White Rock. Map: T08; Classification: C3. Significance: Only known basalt in the Great Barrier region.

 Rakitu Island obsidian breccia. Map: T08; Classification: C3. Significance: Only coastal occurrence of obsidian in Great Barrier region.

 Rangitoto central lava cave (unnamed). Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An unmodified, branched lava cave (total length about 60 m). Publicly accessible. Educational value.

 Rangitoto hornito # 1. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Only publicly accessible example of a hornito in New Zealand.

 Rangitoto hornito # 2. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Easily accessible example of rare, hidden, intact hornitos on Rangitoto Island.

 Rangitoto Island lava levees. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: The surface expression of a drained aa lava flow.

 Rangitoto northern lava cave (unnamed). Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An unmodified publicly accessible lava cave, about 75 m long. Educational value.

 Rangitoto pillow lava lobes. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Only known example in New Zealand of lava lobes that flowed into the sea and were rapidly cooled in the intertidal zone. Prime location for accessibility and interpretation next to main Rangitoto wharf.

 Rangitoto southern lava cave (unnamed). Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: An unmodified 60 m long, straight remnant of a much longer collapsed lava cave. Publicly accessible. Educational value.

 Rangitoto volcano. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: The youngest and largest volcano in the Auckland field. It has an uneroded aa lava surface with a few caves and trenches. Public access by daily ferry. Good potential for further research. The plant colonisation of the rocky surface is of special botanical interest.

 Ratcliffe lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Lava cave about 130 m long.

 Raventhorpe tuff ring. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: A large, reasonably well preserved tuff ring.

 Red Beach Miocene flysch. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Penecontemporaneous slump within Waitemata flysch sequence. Excellent exposure.

 Red Hill volcanic centre. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Complex centre associated with strombolian activity. Quarry and roadcut exposures are of educational value.

 Redoubt Road complex landslide. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: A complex landslide involving slide and slump movement.

 Robertson Hill scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: B3. Significance: A small, cratered, scoria cone within a large, swamp-filled, tuff ring forming a "castle-and-moat" structure. Logs were found at depth within the scoria cone crater.

 Ruapotaka lava shaft, Mt Wellington. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: A vertical lava cave containing some well preserved gas bubble craters about 15 cm in diameter.

 Scotlands lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Lava cave about 160 m long.

 Seagrove Peninsula shell spits, southern Manukau Harbour. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best examples of actively accreting shell spits in the Manukau Harbour.

 Selfs lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: One of only two known lava caves in New Zealand that were formed in lava flows confined within a volcanic crater. Lava cave, about 48 m long, circumferentially oriented within the volcanic crater.

 Shoal Bay shell spits. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Good examples of shell cheniers accreted parallel to the shore and separated from it by low mangrove forest.

 Slater Point fossil sea stack, Kawau Island. Map: R09; Classification: B3. Significance: Possibly the best example of a fossil sea stack in NZ. It is buried by shallow marine conglomerate.

 Snells-Algies intensely faulted siliceous mudstone. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Best and most easily accessible exposure of intensely faulted siliceous mudstone (Ngataturi Siltstone) in northern New Zealand. Part of the Northland Allochthon that was obducted onto Northland and Auckland.

 South Kaheno stack, Rotoroa Island. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of coastal stack with arch and guts. Greywacke has well-exposed faults and folds of varying kinds.

 South Kaipara dune lakes. Map: Q10; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent examples of elongate freshwater lakes between dunes of different ages.

 South Pakatoa shore platform. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Good representative example of a high tidal shore platform eroded in greywacke.

 South Rotoroa Island boxwork weathering. Map: S11; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of boxwork weathering in greywacke.

 South Te Henga sea caves, pillows and hyaloclastites. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Well exposed pillow lavas and hyaloclastites.

 Southdown pahoehoe lava flows. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of few examples of pahoehoe surfaces on basalt lava flows in Auckland volcanic field.

 St Heliers - Karaka Bay Waitemata Group and shoreline. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best section on Auckland Isthmus for study and exposure of Waitemata Sandstone strata. Best place to study the unusual inclusions in Glover Park Volcano tuff (in boulders on the beach). Excellent examples of beach rock formation. Two major reefs along strike of Parnell Grits and several small sea caves. Many examples of different shapes of concretions. Also examples of Coromandel "Granite" in boulders brought in for sewerage works in 1950s. Only place in region for seeing greywackeultramafics (in tuff inclusions). One of few places on isthmus for seeing vertical Waitemata strata. Only place on the isthmus for seeing Holocene beach rock conglomerate. Ladies Bay is only remaining example of a largely natural, unmodified beach on the Auckland City coast of the Waitemata Harbour.

 St Heliers explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Simple, explosion crater on ridge top of Miocene sediments, with neither scoria nor lava. Some schistose inclusions.

 St Kentigern cliffs early Pleistocene sediment sequence. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Best exposed example of early Pleistocene peat, tephra and fossil forest sequence in Auckland City. Study site for history of vegetation and climate changes during glacial-interglacial cycles 1 myrs ago in Auckland. Easily accessible and understood educational site.

 St Leonards Beach, Takapuna, flysch and penecontemporaneous slump unit. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: This outcrop is a well exposed and well studied sequence of typical Waitemata Group deep water flysch with a wide range of sedimentary structures. Parcel of intensely folded beds within typical flysch sequence. One of the most easily accessible examples of a small, intraformational, penecontemporaneous slump unit in the Auckland region. The site is of educational value.

 St Paul's Church, Symonds Street. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: One of the best examples of the use of dark local volcanic stone in combination with light coloured Oamaru Stone.

 Stewarts lava cave (Mortimer's Cave). Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: An excellent example of a lava cave. A two-part lava cave about 180 m long, with two levels, and a cave-in-cave feature. Typical features such as lava rolls, drip formations, etc.

 Stony Batter karstic basalt boulders, Waiheke Island. Map: S10; Classification: A1. Significance: Best example of fluted basalt in New Zealand. Northernmost occurrence of Kiwitahi Volcanics. Site of Waiheke Island's only volcano. Island.

 Tahuna Torea cuspate foreland and shell spit. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: Largest, most accessible and outstanding example of a cuspate foreland formed from two sand/shell spits in the Auckland region. Narrow shell spit extends a further 1 km out across the Tamaki Estuary.

 Takanini pumicite. Map: R12; Classification: B1. Significance: An exposure in South Auckland of primary tephra from Taupo Volcanic Zone.

 Takapuna chabazite. Map: R11; Classification: A3. Significance: The most silica-poor reported, sedimentary chabazite.

 Takapuna Reef fossil forest. Map: R11; Classification: B1. Significance: Only example in New Zealand of a standing forest that has been preserved as lava moulds by lava flows that passed through it. One of the best examples in the world of a lava preserved fossil forest.

 Tamaki Campus basalt. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only exposure and remaining evidence of lava spilling northwards over ridge from Mt Wellington towards Glen Innes. Clearly visible example of columnar jointing in lava flow.

 Tank Farm explosion crater and lagoon. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Least damaged intertidal explosion crater in Auckland. Well preserved tuff ring.

 Tapapakanga Stream terraces. Map: S11; Classification: C2. Significance: Excellent example of small stream terraces in public reserve.

 Tapora barrier island, dune system and wetlands, Kaipara Harbour. Map: Q09; Classification: B3. Significance: Only example in New Zealand of a high-energy-style active barrier island developing within sheltered harbour conditions. Unusual because these features are not typically found inside harbours.

 Tauhoa Rd serpentinite. Map: Q09; Classification: C1. Significance: This roadside exposure of a serpentinite lens entrained by Northland Allochthon is the only exposure of serpentinite blocks remaining in the Auckland Region after others have been quarried away completely.

 Tauhoa sheared multi-coloured mudstone. Map: Q09; Classification: C2. Significance: Most easily accessible, fresh exposures of sheared brown, green and grey Cretaceous and Paleocene mudstones in the Auckland Region.

 Tawharanui Beach and dunes. Map: R09; Classification: C2. Significance: Largest undeveloped and publicly owned beach on east side of Auckland region. Evidence in sand dunes for historic 15th century tsunami deposit.

 Tawharanui fossiliferous Jurassic section. Map: R09; Classification: B3. Significance: Very rare occurrence in North Auckland of basement fossils.

 Taylor Hill scoria cone. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Explosion crater with multiple scoria mounds.

 Te Arai Point dune-dammed lakes. Map: R08; Classification: C2. Significance: Only dune-dammed lakes on the east coast of the Auckland region and best examples of dune-dammed lakes on the east coast of the northern North Island.

 Te Atatu Pleistocene plant beds. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Remnants of swamp and estuarine vegetation of Pleistocene age now exposed at intertidal levels.

 Te Komoki exfoliation dome. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: A rocky dome shaped top of prominant hill.

 Te Matuku Bay shell spit and tidal marsh. Map: S11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best example of a small chenier spit and enclosed tidal marsh on Waiheke Island.

 Te Muri Beach and Estuary, Mahurangi. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Excellent example of a small estuary and sand spit at the mouth of a small drowned valley, mostly in public reserve and in pristine condition with no houses or roads.

 Te Muri salt marsh and shell spits. Map: S11; Classification: C1. Significance: One of best examples of salt marsh and shell spit in the Auckland region.

 Te Titoki Point cuspate foreland, Little Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: B2. Significance: Two boulder barriers have connected to form a triangular shaped infilled flat of about 25 hectares. Best example of a cuspate gravel foreland in New Zealand.

 Te Tokaroa Reef lava flow. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Longest lava flow in Auckland Volcanic Field. It can be followed to low water spring tides.

 Te Toro Quaternary sands. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: Predates the eruptions of Taranaki and Taupo volcanic centres and the subsequent current transport of black sands northwards along the coast.

 Te Waharoa boulder beaches and old hat islet. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance:

 The Arches, Tiritiri Matangi. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Spectacular series of arches through greywacke cliffs on tourist track around Tiritiri Island.

 The Gap volcaniclastic conglomerate, dikes and coastal landforms, South Piha. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Best exposure of high energy, marine coarse volcaniclastic facies in Waitakere Ranges. Best and most easily accessible example of a sea tunnel eroded along a dike in New Zealand. Easily visible and accessible and well formed examples of sea caves, coastal cliffs, high tide platform, small islands, honeycomb weathering and slide blocks.

 The Needles. Map: T09; Classification: C3. Significance: Scenically spectacular rock pinnacles dominating ridge between Tryphena and Medlands.

 The Queen flow-banded dacite, Little Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: Well exposed example of a flow-banded rhyo-dacite and only known exposures providing evidence of the earlier 3 million year old eruptive phase of Little Barrier Island.

 The Watchman dacite dome and crater, Karekare Beach. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: A good example of flow structures in volcanic rocks forming a rocky peak. Only flow-banded dacite in Waitakere Ranges. Best example of a Miocene explosion crater and its fill in New Zealand.

 The Watchman old hat islet. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Old hat islet is an eroded remnant of a drowned Waitemata Sandstone ridge, with shore platform more resistant to erosion processes than islet. Seen by Harbour Bridge motorists.

 Three Kings scoria cones. Map: R11; Classification: C4. Significance: Formerly the largest and most complex centre, now mostly quarried away. Big King has been partly protected by its reserve status.

 Ti Pt basalt intrusion. Map: R09; Classification: C3. Significance: Type locality and best and publicly most accessible example of Ti Pt Basalt.

 Ti Pt basalt karst. Map: R09; Classification: B1. Significance: Only known example of well-developed basalt karst at Ti Pt or anywhere between Auckland and the Brynderwyns. Excellent example of a rare landform internationally.

 Ti Pt mushroom rock. Map: R09; Classification: B1. Significance: An unusual mushroom-shaped erosion feature, rare throughout New Zealand.

 Tidey Road lava flows and levee, Mt Wellington. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: The reserve contains a 5 m high portion of the only remaining lava flow levee on Auckland Isthmus. The adjacent quarry face contains an easily accessible cross-section of educational value through five of the youngest lava flows from Mt Wellington with examples of rubbly breccia layers between lobes, columnar jointing, vesicles, blisters and lava stalactites.

 Tirikohua Point gut and high-tide platform. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Most pronounced example of a number of intertidal guts that have eroded along prominent joints through volcanic sandstones on the coast south of Muriwai. North side abuts against a well-developed example of a wide high-tide platform produced by more rapid erosion of cliff behind.

 Tiritiri Matangi Island shore platform. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Well developed shore platform cut in greywacke.

 Torbay stack. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: Well formed sea stack. Bay and suburb named after it.

 Toroanui and Okiritoto Falls. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Two prominent waterfalls in an area where significant falls are rare.

 Underground Press lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: B2. Significance: A 40 m long lava cave with a large main chamber. Flow features, stalactites and stalagmites are present. Reputedly used as a base for clandestine, subversive publishing during World War II.

 Victoria Park Market former sea cliff. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Provides evidence of former extent of natural shoreline and sandstone cliffs that used to snake through downtown Auckland. Visual evidence of the extent of harbour reclamation in downtown Auckland. One of only four places in downtown Auckland where the old cliffline is publicly accessible and recognisable.

 Waiatarua Swamp. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of best examples of a freshwater lake formed by the damming of a valley by a lava flow in Auckland. Lake sediment peats contain record of Tuhua Tephra and Holocene vegetation changes.

 Waikopua estuary, Whitford. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Little-modified, easily accessible example of a funnel-shaped, limited-fetch estuary.

 Wainamu lakes and sand dunes. Map: Q11; Classification: B2. Significance: Two lakes formed by damming of the valleys by active sand dunes, and little modified by man. Among the best and most easily accessible examples of dune-dammed valley lakes in the country. Includes the active sand dunes.

 Waioneke salt meadows and sandspits. Map: Q10; Classification: C2. Significance: One of the best examples of salt meadows and salt marsh along the coast of the Kaipara Harbour.

 Waiouru tuff ring and explosion crater. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the oldest volcanoes of Auckland volcanic field. One of three last remaining, largely unmodified explosion craters and tuff rings in Manukau City.

 Wairoa North Fault, Paparimu scarp. Map: S12; Classification: C2. Significance: One of best, most easily seen examples of a fault scarp on the only known active fault in the Auckland region.

 Waitakere Falls and bluffs. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Largest single drop falls in Waitakere Ranges and Auckland Region, exposing c. 100 m of stratigraphy. Spectacular conglomerate bluffs create an amphitheatre around it.

 Waitakere River pillow lava flow. Map: Q11; Classification: C2. Significance: Second example in New Zealand (after Muriwai) of a pillow lava flow with large internal cooling fans.

 Waitangi Falls conglomerate. Map: Q10; Classification: C3. Significance: Best, most-easily accessible place to see Helensville Conglomerate unit. Good example of a waterfall held up by a resistant conglomerate unit.

 Waitangi Falls, Glenbrook. Map: R12; Classification: C2. Significance: Most significant waterfall over basalt flow in the South Auckland volcanic field.

 Waitomokia tuff exposures with sedimentary bombs. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Best exposures of tuff in Waitomokia tuff ring and unique example in Auckland Volcanic Field of large ballistic blocks of Miocene sedimentary conglomerate within tuff deposits.

 Waiuku volcanic cone. Map: R12; Classification: C3. Significance: A small volcanic centre. One of the westernmost centres in the South Auckland field.

 Waiwera Hot Springs. Map: R10; Classification: C1. Significance:

 Waiwera Parnell Grit. Map: R10; Classification: B3. Significance: Easily accessible, educational locality showing a complex volcanic sediment gravity flow interbedded with flysch.

 Waiwera stone bathhouse site. Map: R10; Classification: B2. Significance: New Zealand's first European spa using natural hot spring water.

 Wallaby lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: An unmodified complex lava cave with four divergent 20 m long passages. Innumerable small lava stalactites.

 Waterfall Bay Miocene intrusions, Great Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C3. Significance: One of best examples of the Miocene intrusions that intrude the greywacke in the northern end of Great Barrier Island.

 Wattle Bay and beach, north Manukau Harbour. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: One of few remaining largely pristine bays and beaches on the northern shores of the Manukau Harbour within Auckland City. Has not been modified by constructed erosion retardation walls, landfill and houses near the coast.

 Weiti River shell spits. Map: R10; Classification: B1. Significance: Some of the best examples in New Zealand of mid Holocene and actively forming intertidal shell spits, important in documenting Holocene sea level.

 Wesley Bay-Cape Horn section. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Type locality for a few microfossils and a few macrofossils described from the Parnell Grit around Faulkner Bay. Excellent exposures of a wide range of features that characterise this part of the Waitemata Basin on the lower flanks of the Waitakere Volcano - volcaniclastic Parnell Grit debris flow beds, deformation and clastic dikes associated with their emplacement and variations in their content, including diverse fossil material; thick and thin sandstone turbidite beds, graded and massive; thin-bedded and laminated siltstones and fine sandstone beds with carbonaceous laminae, ripples, trace fossils, microfaulting, water expulsion structures; large and small scale folding, vertical bedding, large and small scale normal, reverse and thrust faults.

 West Tamaki Head reef, St Heliers. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: Largest and most eastern of a series of prominent intertidal reefs jutting into the Waitemata Harbour from Auckland’s eastern bays’ coastline.

 Western Springs and lava outcrops. Map: R11; Classification: C2. Significance: Good exposures of natural edge of Auckland's longest lava flow with examples of small lava tongues, some with pahoehoe remnants.

 Whangaparaoa Head shore platform. Map: R10; Classification: C3. Significance: An extensive intertidal platform cut across dipping Waitemata sandstones and siltstones.

 Whangaparaoa Peninsula Waitemata Group deformation. Map: R10; Classification: C2. Significance: Superb examples of three dimensional exposure of folds (including slumping and synsedimentary folding) and faults in Miocene Waitemata Group rocks.

 Whangapoua Estuary, spit and tsunami deposit, Great Barrier Island. Map: S08; Classification: B2. Significance: One of the best preserved and most extensive tsunami deposits in New Zealand. Between 510 and 660 years old and extending up to 14 m above sea level. Best example of a pristine estuary on Great Barrier Island and possibly in the Auckland region.

 Whatipu Caves and pyroclastic breccia dikes. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Sea caves, now abandoned due to aggrading coastline. Best exposed group of pyroclastic dikes of volcanic origin in northern New Zealand.

 Whatipu coastal flats and dunes. Map: Q11; Classification: B3. Significance: Huge area of sand flats and low dunes, most of which were deposited between 1900-1930. The best example of rapid recent sand aggradation in New Zealand. Sand flats extend 1.5-2 km out to sea.

 White Bluff structures. Map: R11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of the best exposures of complexly deformed Waitemata Group rocks in the Auckland area.

 Whites Beach crater. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: One of three best exposed craters in Waitakere Ranges. Unusual type of pillow lava.

 Whitford boulder. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Only evidence for existence of Pliocene river flowing through this part of Auckland from the Coromandel Range. Publicly easily accessible. Tainui canoe mooring stone in traditional history.

 Wilsons Cement works, Warkworth. Map: R09; Classification: A1. Significance: First Portland cement plant in the Southern Hemisphere. Well preserved historic relics.

 Windy Canyon, Great Barrier. Map: S08; Classification: C2. Significance: Most scenic and easily accessible and well developed area of small gorges and rounded knolls eroded out of ignimbrite on Great Barrier. A tourist attraction.

 Wiri lava cave. Map: R11; Classification: A1. Significance: The best example of a lava cave in New Zealand and also the longest known lava cave in New Zealand.

 Wiri Mt tuff and lava flows. Map: R11; Classification: C1. Significance: Best exposure of buried tuff ring and overlying lava flows of Wiri volcano.

 Wonga Wonga Bay submarine slide. Map: Q11; Classification: C3. Significance: Unique example, probably in New Zealand, of a section of dike caught up in a submarine slide deposit.